Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
"There are already among us those, who, if the 
Union be preserved, will live to see it contain 
two hundred and fifty millions of population. The 
struggle of to-day is not altogether for to-day: it is 
for a vast future also.”

- Abraham Lincoln 

From: The president's words : a selection of passages from the speeches, addresses, and letters of Abraham Lincoln
https://archive.org/details/presidentswords00lincrich/page/118/mode/1up
Source says not in copyright 

By the early 1990s the population of The United States surpassed 250 million people.  

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Allan Pinkerton, President Abraham Lincoln, and Major General John A. McClernand

- Antietam, 1862

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"That is the electric cord in the Declaration that links the hearts of patriotic and liberty-loving men together..."

Read more: 
https://heartfelthistory.com/we-hold-these-truths/
"Here, without contemplating consequences, before Heaven, and in the face of the world, I swear eternal fidelity to the just cause, as I deem it, of the land of my life, my liberty, and my love; and who that thinks with me will not fearlessly adopt the oath that I take?”

- Abraham Lincoln c. 1839

Image via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Abraham Lincoln, U.S. President. Seated portrait, facing front, January 8th, 1864

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"I was raised to farm work, at which I continued till I was twenty-two. At twenty-one I came to Illinois, and passed the first year in Macon County. Then I got to New Salem, at that time in Sangamon, now Menard County, where I remained a year as a sort of a clerk in a store. Then came the Black Hawk War, and I was elected a captain of volunteers a success which gave me more pleasure than any I have had since. I went into the campaign, was elected, ran for the Legislature the same year (1832), and was beaten the only time I have ever been beaten by the people. The next and three succeeding biennial elections I was elected to the Legislature. I was not a candidate afterward. During the legislative period I had studied law, and removed to Springfield to practice it. In 1846 I was elected to the Lower House of Congress. Was not a candidate for re-election. From 1849 to 1854, both inclusive, practiced law more assiduously than ever before. Always a Whig in politics, and generally on the Whig electoral ticket, making active canvasses. I was losing interest in politics when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again. What I have done since then is pretty well known. 

If any personal description of me is thought desirable, it may be said I am in height six feet four  inches, nearly; lean in flesh, weighing, on an average, one hundred,  eighty pounds; dark complexion, with coarse black hair and gray eyes no other marks or brands recollected. 

Yours, very truly, Abraham Lincoln”

From: Words of Lincoln, including several hundred opinions of his life and character by eminent persons of this and other lands. Published in 1895
https://archive.org/details/wordsoflincolnin00lincrich/page/40/mode/1up
Source says not in copyright 

Image of Abraham Lincoln c. 1860 via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"Gold is good in its place; but living, brave, and patriotic men are better than gold." 

- Abraham Lincoln 

Image: rare photograph of Abraham Lincoln via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Lincoln statue, Park Square, Boston, Mass.

- Early 1900s

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Image of the Lincoln Family sometime after the death of Willie Lincoln (portrait on the wall) in 1862.

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"Fellow-citizens, we can not escape history.”

- Abraham Lincoln from his Second State of The Union Address on December 1st, 1862 

Image of Abraham Lincoln via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Lincoln as a boy reading at night 

When Abraham Lincoln was a boy in 1816, his family left Kentucky and moved to Indiana.
1816 was the same year that Indiana entered the Union.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Now, my countrymen, if you have been taught doctrines conflicting with the great landmarks of the Declaration of Independence; if you have listened to suggestions which would take away from its grandeur and mutilate the fair symmetry of its proportions; if you have been inclined to believe that all men are not created equal in those inalienable rights enumerated by our chart of liberty, let me entreat you to come back. Return to the fountain whose waters spring close by the blood of the revolution. Think nothing of me — take no thought for the political fate of any man whomsoever — but come back to the truths that are in the Declaration of Independence. 
You may do anything with me you choose, if you will but heed these sacred principles. You may not only defeat me for the Senate, but you may take me and put me to death. While pretending no indifference to earthly honors, I do claim to be actuated in this contest by something higher than an anxiety for office. I charge you to drop every paltry and insignificant thought for any man's success. It is nothing; I am nothing; Judge Douglas is nothing. But do not destroy that immortal emblem of Humanity — the Declaration of American Independence.”

- Abraham Lincoln in 1858

From: Selected writings of Abraham Lincoln
https://archive.org/details/selectedwritings01linc/page/101/mode/2up
Source says not in copyright 

Image of Abraham Lincoln c. 1864 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Photograph of Abraham Lincoln just a few months before he made his famous Gettysburg Address in November 1863.

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Abraham Lincoln and Family 

- 1861

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Portrait of Abraham Lincoln from October, 1858

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"May I be pardoned, if, upon this occasion, I mention, that away back in my childhood — the earliest days of my being able to read — I got hold of a small book, such a one as few of the younger members have ever seen, 'Weems Life of Washington’ ; I remember all the accounts there given of the battlefields and struggles for the liberties of the country, and none fixed themselves upon my imagination so deeply as the struggle here at Trenton. The crossing of the river, the contest with the Hessians, the great hardships endured at that time, all fixed themselves on my memory more than any single Revolutionary event; and you all know, for you have all been (children), how these early impressions last longer than any other. 

I recollect thinking then, boy even though I was, that there must have been something more than common that those men struggled for.

I am exceedingly anxious that that thing which they struggled for — that something even more than National independence, that something that held out a great promise to all the people of the world for all time to come — I am exceedingly anxious that this Union, the Constitution, and the liberties of the people, shall be perpetuated in 
accordance with the original idea for which that 
struggle was made, and I shall be most happy, indeed, if I shall be a humble instrument in the hands of the Almighty, and of this, his most chosen people, for perpetuating the object of the great struggle.”

- Abraham Lincoln, Address in the Senate Chamber, Trenton, N.J., February 21, 1861.

From: The Words of Lincoln, published in 1895 
https://archive.org/details/wordsoflincoln00linc/page/61/mode/2up
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Profile image of Abraham Lincoln c. 1863 via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
“He from whom all blessings flow, must not be forgotten.“

- Abraham Lincoln from his Final Public Address in 1865

Image of Lincoln by Anthony Berger from 1864 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An artist’s depiction of Abraham Lincoln debating Stephen Douglas 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan—to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations.”

- Abraham Lincoln from the conclusion of his Second Inaugural Address in 1865 

Image of Abraham Lincoln in 1863 by Mathew Brady via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"The will of God prevails. In great contests each party claims to act in accordance with the will of God. Both may be, and one must be, wrong. God cannot be for and against the same thing at the same time."

- Abraham Lincoln in September 1862 from his Meditation on The Divine Will 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A photo of Abraham Lincoln that is believed to have been taken less than two weeks before he delivered his famous Gettysburg Address

- 1863

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An artist’s interpretation of Abraham Lincoln as a young man 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Mount Rushmore - sometime before 1976

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.”

- Abraham Lincoln during a speech at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, 1861

Image: Abraham Lincoln in 1861, public domain
"But I beg of you, as citizens of this great Republic, not to let your minds be carried off from the great work we have before us. This struggle is too large for you to be diverted from it by any small matter. When you return to your homes rise up to the height of a generation of men worthy of a free Government, and we will carry out the great work we have commenced.”

- Abraham Lincoln to the One Hundred Sixty-fourth Ohio Regiment in 1864

Image: Abraham Lincoln c. 1860 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"When God created this good world
A few stupendous peaks were hurled
From His strong hand, and they remain
The wonder of the level plain.
But these colossal heights are rare,
While shifting sands are everywhere.

So with the race. The centuries pass
And nations fall like leaves of grass.
They die, forgotten and unsung;
While straight from God some souls are flung,
To live immortal and sublime.
So lives great Lincoln for all time.”

Lincoln, by American poet Ella Wheeler Wilcox c. 1917

Image: Statue of Abraham Lincoln in Lincoln Park Chicago by AndrewHorne CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
"But poverty was no hindrance to Abraham Lincoln. He kept on with his reading and his studies as best he could. Sometimes he would go to the little village of Gentryville, near by, to spend an evening. He would tell so many jokes and so many funny stories, that all the people would gather round him to listen.

When he was sixteen years old he went one day to Booneville, fifteen miles away, to attend a trial in court. He had never been in court before. He listened with great attention to all that was said. When the lawyer for the defense made his speech, the youth was so full of delight that he could not contain himself.

He arose from his seat, walked across the courtroom, and shook hands with the lawyer. "That was the best speech I ever heard," he said.

He was tall and very slim; he was dressed in a jeans coat and buckskin trousers; his feet were bare. It must have been a strange sight to see him thus complimenting an old and practiced lawyer.”

From: Four Great Americans:  Washington, Franklin, Webster, Lincoln by James Baldwin, published in 1897
https://archive.org/details/fourgreatamerica00bal/page/208/mode/1up?
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Lincoln in 1864 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Daguerreotype of Abraham Lincoln

c. 1864

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Lincoln's second inaugural

- 1865 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Lincoln Books, Lincoln document replicas including the Gettysburg Address and more at The Heartfelt History Gift Shoppe!

https://www.ebay.com/str/heartfelthistorygiftshoppe/Abraham-Lincoln/_i.html?_storecat=35594659012

Free shipping and a Free historical Holiday Ornament when you purchase $35 or more
Allan Pinkerton, President Abraham Lincoln and Major General John A. McClernand at Antietam

- October 3rd, 1862

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Log cabin built by Abraham Lincoln in Spencer County, Indiana.

Image c. 1860-1920 via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Jessie Harlan Lincoln 
Abraham Lincoln’s granddaughter 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An artist’s interpretation of Lincoln's address at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery, November 19th, 1863

"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.
Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

- Abraham Lincoln

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
“Abraham Lincoln, candidate for U.S. president, three-quarter length portrait, before delivering his Cooper Union address in New York City / Brady, N.Y.”

Photo was taken on the morning of February 27th, 1860.

From Library of Congress:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/98504529/
Abraham Lincoln posing in a borrowed coat

- 1858

by Samuel G. Alschuler via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
“The world has never had a good definition of the word liberty, and the American people, just now, are much in want of one. We all declare for liberty; but in using the same word we do not all mean the same thing.”

- Abraham Lincoln, 1864

Image: President Abraham Lincoln, three-quarter length portrait, seated, 1861
via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2009630687/
"Picture of Mrs. Norah Gridley, cousin of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln, and Miss May Coleman, the typewriter, taken outside of and near the corner of the Lincoln Cabin”

- 1891

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005696649/
A photograph of Abraham Lincoln dated June 3rd, 1860

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008680253/
On June 16th, 1858 in Springfield, Illinois Abraham Lincoln delivered his acceptance speech upon receiving the Republican nomination for United States Senate and said:

"A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand."

Image: Abraham Lincoln in 1858 
via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Abraham Lincoln with his son Thomas (Tad)

- 1865

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Abraham Lincoln’s dog, Fido

c. 1860

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On today's date November 4th, 1842: Mary Ann Todd married Abraham Lincoln.

Photo: By Mary_Todd_Lincoln_1846-1847.jpg: Shepherd, Nicolas H., photographer. derivative work: Beao (Mary_Todd_Lincoln_1846-1847.jpg) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
On today's date November 6th, 1860: Abraham Lincoln was elected to be the 16th President of the United States. 

Photo: Abraham Lincoln taken February 27, 1860 in New York City by Mathew Brady, the day of his famous Cooper Union speech
Credit: Library of Congress, American Memory Collection, Words and Deeds in American History, Civil War Photo Album 1861-65, James Wadsworth Family Papers. Photographer: Matthew Brady.
Public Domain: Wikimedia Commons
Photograph of Abraham Lincoln by Samuel M. Fassett - October 4th, 1859 in Chicago, IL

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain in The United States
https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lincoln_O-16_by_Fassett_,_1859,_LC-USZ62-11492.png#mw-jump-to-license
“Honor to the Soldier, and Sailor everywhere, who bravely bears his country's cause. Honor also to the citizen who cares for his brother in the field, and serves, as he best can, the same cause - honor to him, only less than to him, who braves, for the common good, the storms of heaven and the storms of battle.”

From a letter by Abraham Lincoln in December 1863 to George Opdyke
On today's date September 22nd, 1862: just days after the Battle of Antietam, United States President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. It declared that all persons held as slaves within rebel states would be free as of January 1, 1863.

https://vimeo.com/49268850

Photo: Francis Bicknell Carpenter • Public domain
🇺🇸365 Reasons To Cherish America!🇺🇸 

Day/Reason #275: George Peter Alexander Healy's portrait of Abraham Lincoln 

http://livinglincoln.web.unc.edu/2015/04/07/abraham-lincoln-by-george-peter-alexander-healy/

https://americanart.si.edu/artist/george-peter-alexander-healy-2141

Photo: Abraham Lincoln portrait by George P.A. Healy (1813 - 1894) - Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
“Abraham Lincoln, President, U.S.”

c. 1861

by Mathew Brady 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
“The latest photograph of President Lincoln - taken on the balcony at the White House, March 6th, 1865”

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2006677596/
“The political biographers of Mr. Lincoln have stated that in 1846 he was "induced to accept" the nomination for Congress from the Sangamon district. It has already been seen that he had aspirations for this place; and it is quite as well to adopt Mr. Lincoln's own frankness and directness, and say that the Representatives of his wishes secured the nomination for him. As a party man, he had well earned any honor in the power of his party to bestow. As a man and a politician, his character was so sound and so truly noble that his nomination and election to Congress would be quite as honorable to his district as to him. 

Having received the nomination, Mr. Lincoln did after the manner of Western nominees and "stumped" his district. He had abundant material for discussion. During the winter of 1845, Texas was admitted to the Union, and the war with Mexico was commenced. The tariff of 1842, constructed in accordance with the policy of the whig party, had been repealed. The country had a foreign war on its hands — a war which the whigs believed to have been unnecessarily begun, and unjustifiably carried on. It had received into the Union a new member in the interest of slavery. It had been greatly disturbed in its industrial Interests by the subversion of the protective policy. The Issues between the two parties then in the political field were positive and well defined. Mr. Lincoln's position on all the principal points at issue was that of the whig party, and the party had no reason to be ashamed of its western champion. 

The eminent popularity of Mr. Lincoln in his own district was shown by the majority he received over that which it had given to Mr. Clay. Although he had made Mr. Clay's cause his own, and had advocated his election with an enthusiasm which no personal object could have excited in him, he received in his district a majority of one thousand five hundred and eleven votes to the nine hundred and fourteen majority which the district had given Mr. Clay in 1844. He undoubtedly was supported by more than the strength of his party, for his majority was unprecedented in the district, and has since had no parallel. It was not reached, on a much larger vote, by General Taylor in 1848. There is no question that this remarkable majority was the result of the popular faith in Mr. Lincoln's earnestness, conscientiousness and integrity. 

He took his seat in the thirtieth Congress, December 6th, 1847.”

From: Life of Abraham Lincoln by J. G. Holland, published in 1866
https://archive.org/details/lifeofabrahamlin02holl/page/99
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Abraham Lincoln in 1846 or 1847 by Nicholas H. Shepherd via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
“Abraham Lincoln, candidate for U.S. president. Head-and-shoulders portrait...June 3, 1860”

Photo by Alexander Hesler via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2008680253/
Abraham Lincoln and George B. McClellan in the general's tent at Antietam 

- October, 1862

by Alexander Gardner via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"The Union is much older than the Constitution. It was formed, in fact, by the Articles of Association in 1774. It was matured and continued by the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It was further matured, and the faith of all the then thirteen States expressly plighted and engaged that it should be perpetual, by the Articles of Confederation in 1778. And, finally, in 1787 one of the declared objects for ordaining and establishing the Constitution was 'to form a more perfect Union.’”

From Abraham Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address in 1861
A photograph of Abraham Lincoln

- May 20th, 1860

by William Marsh via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
American sculptor Vinnie Ream with her bust of Abraham Lincoln 

- 1865

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"... this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

From Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in 1863

Image: Abraham Lincoln in 1861 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain 

shorturl.at/GKP02 
shorturl.at/abALY
shorturl.at/actvT
Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, taken in Washington at Alexander Gardner's studio on August 9th, 1863

by Alexander Gardner [Public domain in US], via Wikimedia Commons
Title: Hon. Abraham Lincoln, Republican candidate for the presidency, 1860 / Grozelier ; painted by Hicks ; lith. by L. Grozelier, Boston.  - Library of Congress, public domain
“Abraham Lincoln, seated next to small table, in a reflective pose, May 16, 1861”

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002714523/
"President Abraham Lincoln, with beard; half-length portrait, seated profile”

Taken on February 9th, 1864

Photo by Anthony Berger via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2013645981/
On February 1st, 1865 Abraham Lincoln inscribed "Approved” next to his signature on the 13th Amendment which abolished slavery in the United States.

Illinois was the first state to ratify the amendment on the same date.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Abraham Lincoln 

- 1857

by Alexander Hesler via Wikimedia Commons, public domain in The United States
“Our defense is in the preservation of the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands, everywhere.”

- Abraham Lincoln

Image: Abraham Lincoln by Byers, 1858 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain in The United States
"...while man exists, it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind.”

- Abraham Lincoln in 1861

Image: Lincoln after his nomination for President in 1860 by Alexander Hessler via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On September 22nd, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation 

Image: Emancipation Proclamation, September 22, 1862 (1919), by E.G. Renesch via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A portrait of Samuel J. Seymour taken sometime before 1956.

Samuel J. Seymour was the last surviving witness of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination at Ford’s Theatre in April of 1865.  He was only 5 years old at the time.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On today’s date February 12th, 1809 Abraham Lincoln was born at Sinking Spring Farm in Kentucky.

Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was a self-taught lawyer?

Image: Five dollar bill portrait of Abraham Lincoln via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/96524282/
"This dust was once the man,
Gentle, plain, just and resolute, under whose cautious hand,
Against the foulest crime in history known in any land or age,
Was saved the Union of these States.”

Poem titled "This Dust Was Once the Man” by Walt Whitman written in 1871 in memory of Abraham Lincoln.

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/

Image via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions
"Born, Feb. 12, 1809, in Hardin County, Kentucky. 

Education defective. 

Profession, a lawyer. Have been a captain of 
volunteers in the Black-Hawk war. 

Postmaster at a very small office. Four times 
a member of the Illinois Legislature. And was a 
member of the lower house of Congress. 

Yours, &c., 

A. LINCOLN.”
The early home of Abraham Lincoln as it stood near Elizabethtown, Hardin Co. Ky.

c. 1880s

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Abraham Lincoln and others at Antietam
Lincoln’s bodyguard, Ward Hill Lamon, is seated on the left

- October 3rd, 1862

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
President Lincoln’s funeral procession in New York City in 1865 

A young Theodore Roosevelt and his brother are watching from the second floor of the building with open shutters looking out the window that’s facing the photographer 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Abraham Lincoln, Congressman-elect from Illinois. 
Springfield, Ill., 1846 or 1847

Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
President Abraham Lincoln seated next to small table, February 24th, 1861

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"...Let us be diverted by none of those sophistical contrivances wherewith we are so industriously plied and belabored - contrivances such as groping for some middle ground between the right and the wrong, vain as the search for a man who should be neither a living man nor a dead man - such as a policy of "don't care" on a question about which all true men do care - such as Union appeals beseeching true Union men to yield to Disunionists, reversing the divine rule, and calling, not the sinners, but the righteous to repentance - such as invocations to Washington, imploring men to unsay what Washington said, and undo what Washington did.”

- Abraham Lincoln from his Cooper Union Speech delivered on February 27th, 1860 in New York City.

Image of Abraham Lincoln taken on 2/27/1860 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"My paternal grandfather, Abraham Lincoln, emigrated from Rockingham County, Virginia, to Kentucky, about 1781 or 2, where, a year ​or two later, he was killed by indians,— not in battle, but by stealth, when he was laboring to open a farm in the forest—His ancestors, who were quakers, went to Virginia from Berks County, Pennsylvania— An effort to identify them with the New England family of the same name ended in nothing more definite, than a similarity of Christian names in both families, such as Enoch, Levi, Mordecai, Solomon, Abraham, and the like—

My father, at the death of his father, was but six years of age; and he grew up, literally without education— He removed from Kentucky to what is now Spencer county, Indiana, in my eighth year— We reached our new home about the time the State came into the Union— It was a wild region, with many bears and other wild animals still in the woods— There I grew up—“

by Abraham Lincoln from a Letter to his friend Jesse W. Fell c. 1859
A postcard of the Wills House in Gettysburg, PA where Abraham Lincoln stayed the night before he delivered his Gettysburg Address in 1863.

Historians believe that Lincoln finished writing his famous speech here. 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Engine "Nashville" of the Lincoln funeral train 

c. 1865

via Wikimedia Commons public domain
"Niagara-Falls! By what mysterious power is it that millions and millions, are drawn from all parts of the world, to gaze upon Niagara Falls? There is no mystery about the thing itself. Every effect is just such as any intelligent man knowing the causes, would anticipate, without seeing it. If the water moving onward in a great river, reaches a point where there is a perpendicular jog, of a hundred feet in descent, in the bottom of the river,---it is plain the water will have a violent and continuous plunge at that point. It is also plain the water, thus plunging, will foam, and roar, and send up a mist, continuously, in which last, during sunshine, there will be perpetual rainbows.”

- Abraham Lincoln 

Image:  Niagara Falls by Ferdinand Richardt, 1865 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"ALL AMERICAN CITIZENS ARE BROTHERS."

(Rejoicing over the November election, Springfield, III., November 20, 1860, at a political meeting.)

"I rejoice with you in the success which has so 
far attended the Republican cause, yet in all our 
rejoicing let us neither express nor cherish any hard feelings toward any citizen who by his vote differed with us. Let us at all times remember that all American citizens are brothers of a common country, and should dwell together in the bonds of fraternal feeling."

From: Words of Lincoln, published in 1895 
https://archive.org/details/wordsoflincolnlc00linc/page/49/mode/1up 
Source says not in copyright

Image: Abraham Lincoln from NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Kids looking for something to do? Give them a gift that’s both educational and fun...

Abraham Lincoln Coloring Book now available at Heartfelt History Gift Shoppe Premium 

https://heartfelthistory.com/store/abraham-lincoln-coloring-book/
PARDON FOR A DESERTER

(Remarks to Honorable Schuyler Colfax who asked for a respite) 

"Some of our generals complain that I impair discipline and subordination in the army by my pardons and respites, but it makes me rested, after a day's hard work, if I can find some good excuse for saving a man's life; and I go to bed happy as I think how joyous the signing of my name makes him and his family and his friends." 

- Abraham Lincoln 

From: Words of Lincoln, published in 1895
https://archive.org/details/wordsoflincoln00linc/page/115/
Source says not in copyright
Tad Lincoln, the fourth son of Abraham Lincoln 

- 1862

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
FAITH IN GOD. 

"If we have patience, if we restrain ourselves, if 
we allow ourselves not to run off in a passion, 
I still have confidence that the Almighty, the Maker 
of the universe, will, through the instrumentality of 
this great and intelligent people, bring us through 
this as he has through all the other difficulties of 
our country.”

- Abraham Lincoln in 1861 

From: The President's words : a selection of passages from the speeches, addresses, and letters of Abraham Lincoln, published in 1865
https://archive.org/details/presidentswordss00linc/page/118/mode/2up
No known restrictions 

Image of Abraham Lincoln in 1861 via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/
President Lincoln entering Richmond on April 4th, 1865

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
The chair that Abraham Lincoln was using at Ford’s Theatre on April 14th, 1865. 

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/
"It is your business to rise up and preserve Union and Liberty, for yourselves, and not for me."

- Abraham Lincoln in 1861

Image via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/
The first place that Mary Todd and Abraham Lincoln lived together as a married couple was a boarding room in a tavern.

Their first child, Robert Todd Lincoln, was born there.

Image: The Globe Tavern in Springfield, Illinois c. mid 1800s via Alamy 

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/
President Lincoln's funeral services in the White House, April 19th, 1865

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/abraham-lincoln/
Some reminiscences in south western Indiana still tell of Nancy Hanks, and of the impression of gentleness and brightness she left everywhere she went, like a ray of sunshine. Indeed, the last words recorded that she ever said were, "Cheer up!” This was but a few days before her death, when, as the Rev. Allen Brooner tells us, she went to visit his mother, who was very ill, and who said despondently: "Mrs. Lincoln, I am going to die, You will not see me again while living. “You must not say that," said Mrs, Lincoln. "Why, you will live longer than I. So cheer up!" 

It was but a few days later, on the fifth day of the glorious October of the year 1818 that this prophecy came true and the body of Nancy Hanks was laid to rest under the golden autumn leaves, in a lonely and yet enchanted spot on the top of the hill near Lincoln Station, Ind. There where Nancy and her boy had often sat together and watched the gorgeous colors of the glorious sun set far over the hills is now a simple white head stone which says: 

"Nancy Hanks Lincoln, Mother of President Lincoln, Died October 5, A.D. 1818. Age thirty-five years. Erected by a friend of her martyred son." 

To this quiet, restful spot not even a wagon road leads. It is better so, for Nancy Hanks had finished her work. She had kept the faith. 

The first letter that Abraham Lincoln ever wrote with that hand which was afterward to electrify the nation was about his mother that mother whom he had loved so dearly and had so early lost, This letter was written by Abraham when he was ten years old, several months after his mother’s death. It was to Parson David Elkins, whom he asked to come and "preach a memorial service for my mother." So it happened one Sunday morning that two hundred people assembled about the Lincoln cabin, and from there proceeded to the tree beneath which her body was laid to rest. There the touching services were read by Rev. David Elkins, who had ridden a hundred miles on horseback through the wilderness to preach the funeral sermon for Nancy Hanks, of whom Abraham Lincoln said in after years... 

"All that I am or hope to be I owe to my angel mother. Blessings on her memory.”

From: Nancy Hanks; the story of Abraham Lincoln's mother by Caroline Hanks Hitchcock, published in 1899
https://archive.org/details/nancyhanksstory00hitcrich/page/102/mode/2up
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Engraving of Abraham Lincoln via Library of Congress, no known restrictions