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Two Mohave braves dressed in loincloths; full-length, standing, western Arizona

- 1871

by American photographer Timothy H. O’Sullivan via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Mato-Tope - Adorned with the insignia of his warlike deeds”

c. 1839

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Kaw-u-tz, Caddo  

- 1906 

From: DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
John Comes Again

c. 1899

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2006679019/
"Chief Crow Dog, rifle and horse”

- 1898

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Walking Shooter-Wah-Koo-Ta-Mon-Ih. UNC-Pa-Pa Sioux

- 1872 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Arapaho Chief

- 1898

by Frank Rinehart from Boston Public Library via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY SA 2.0
Wa-lis-te-me-ne-head, “Man of the Cayuses”

- 1905

by Lee Moorhouse via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief Umapine, Cayuse 

- 1913 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Portrait of a Cheyenne warrior 

- sometime between 1871-1907

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Broken Arm, Sioux

- 1899

by Frank Rinehart from Boston Public Library via Wikimedia Commons, CC-BY SA 2.0
"Bitter-Man” - Chippewa Chief 

Photo taken c. 1862-1875

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sitting Bull 

- 1883

by George W. Scott 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief Big Road of the Oglala Sioux who fought at Little Big Horn 

Image c. 1896
via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Arapahoe Indian Chiefs at Ft. Washakie, Wyoming Territory, at time of visit of President Chester A. Arthur”

- 1883

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
"Agichida, Assiniboin”

- August 16th, 1927

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2006679608/
Pawnee Chiefs

c. 1860-1865

by Mathew Brady via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An aquatint by Swiss artist Karl Bodmer from the 1830s showing him and Prince Maximilian meeting Native Americans during their tour of the American West. 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Tukiha Maza” - Sioux Chief Iron Shell

- 1900

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Crow Indian warriors. (Group posing in front of a teepee) by F. Jay Haynes 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
William Sitting Bull, the son of Sitting Bull 

Later in his early 20’s William Sitting Bull became a performer in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West.

Image c. 1891
via Wikimedia Commons,  CC BY-SA 4.0
Lieut. John Pershing, Commander, with his Troop B Oglala Indian Scouts, US Cavalry

- 1891

via Alamy
Black Foot, Standing Bear, Big Eagle, Sioux

- 1898

via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions
On the shores of the Pacific - Tolowa woman 

c. 1923

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
The prayer to the sun, Hopi.

- 1906

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Rabbit-Tail, Shoshone member of Captain Ray's scout company with bracelets and ornamented vest

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
President Calvin Coolidge wearing a headdress presented to him by the Sioux Indians

- 1927

via Alamy
Seminole woman holding a child 

- late 1800s - early 1900s

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Native American chiefs during their visit to Washington, D.C. to meet with President Coolidge 

- January 25th, 1924

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Chief of the desert
Navajo man

- 1904

by Edward S. Curtis via NYPL Digital Collections, public domain
Cheyenne baby with lucky charm

c. 1904 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Photograph of Geronimo when he was held as a prisoner in San Antonio, Texas 

c. 1886

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Cheyenne Chiefs

- January 1924

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Navajo silversmith 

- 1915

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Iron Shell Wild West show portrait

c.1908

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief Goes to War, Sioux

- 1898

via The J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
"The tale of the tribe, Taos.”

c. 1900-1910

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Peu-Peu-Mox-Mox of the Nez Perce Tribe

- 1908

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Tecumseh, the Shawnee leader, was born about 10 years after the approach of Halley’s Comet of 1758-1759.

Tecumseh’s War began the same year as the arrival of The Great Comet of 1811.

Tecumseh’s name means... “Shooting Star”

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
The Arrow maker and his daughter

c. 1872

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Jicarilla Apache girl in feast dress

c. 1905

by Edward S. Curtis via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Nez Perce couple in front of teepee

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An Ojibwe hunter in Winter 

c. 1908

by Roland W. Reed via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Piute Indian boy

c. 1860 

via J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
Portrait of a Native American woman in front of teepee, Minnesota 

c. 1862-1875

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Geronimo 

- 1905

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
"Bad Bear, American Indian”

- 1900

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Nez Perce Man  

- 1899

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Donald Mc Ky, the celebrated Warm Spring Indian Scout and his chief men.

c. 1873

via J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
Medicine Cloud 

- 1900

via The J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
Ako, a Comanche warrior with horse 

- 1892 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Gall 

A fierce Sioux Indian war chief who fought with Sitting Bull in many battles including the Battle of Little Big Horn 

Image: Chief Gall c. 1880 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sitting Bull with family 

c. 1881 

From Von Bern via Wikimedia Commons CC-BY-SA 4.0
Old Apache Scout 

c. 1900-1910

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Eskimo reading Saturday Evening Post in the arctic region

- 1913 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Beautiful image of an Apache woman named Mizheh holding her baby at the base of a large tree 

- Image dated December 19th, 1906 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Laban Little Wolf - Cheyenne

c. early 1900s

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
A young Native American woman who is sick is visited by a Medicine Man 

c. 1870 

via J. Paul Getty Museum, no known restrictions
Sitting Bull 

- 1885

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Jno. Ayers, Chief of Weeminuche tribe of Ute and Miss Meleta Chavez”

-  11/12/25

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Native Americans from California 

via New York Public Library, no known restrictions
Native American Ghost Dance in Oklahoma Territory 

c. 1885-1900

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
James Spotted Elk, a young Sioux boy

- July 13th, 1900

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004679594/
"While the last act of the drama, the final scene in Sitting Bull's career as a warrior, was enacted at noon on July 20th, when, by the hand of his little son, he delivered to Major Brotherton the rifle he had carried throughout so many bloody fields. This being done, the great chieftain spoke as follows: 

"I surrender this rifle to you through my young son, whom I now desire to teach in this manner that he has become a friend of the Americans. I wish him to learn the habits of the whites and to be educated as their sons are educated. I wish it to be remembered that I was the last man of my tribe to surrender my rifle. This boy has given it to you, and he now wants to know how he is going to make a living. Whatever you have to give or whatever you have to say, I would like to receive or hear now, for I don't wish to be kept in darkness longer. I have sent several messengers in here from time to time, but none of them have returned with news. The other chiefs, Crow King and Gaul, have not wanted me to come, and I have never received good news from here. I now wish to be allowed to live this side of the line or the other, as I see fit. I wish to continue my old life of hunting, but would like to be allowed to trade on both sides of the line. This is my country, and I don't wish to be compelled to give it up. My heart was very sad at having to 
leave the great mother's country. She has been a friend to me, but I want my children to grow up in our native country, and I also wish to feel that I can visit two of my friends on the other side of the line, viz.: Major Walsh and Captain McDonald, whenever I wish, and would like to trade with Louis Legare, as he has always been a friend to me. I wish to have all my people live together upon one reservation of our own on the Little Missouri...”

From: Campaigns of General Custer in the North-west, and the final surrender of Sitting Bull
by Judson Elliott Walker, published in 1881
https://archive.org/details/campaignsofgener00walkrich/page/74/mode/1up
Source says not in copyright 

Image: A cabinet card Sitting Bull from 1881 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief of the Yavapai Apaches at Date Creek - Ahoochy Kahmah

c. 1870

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97507937/
Noatak child, Alaska

c. 1929 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/93503088/
Lone Bear, Kiowa 

- 1870

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Studio portrait of a young Native American woman in tradtional clothing

c. 1870-1879

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Photography Collection, The New York Public Library. (1870 - 1879). Studio portrait of a young Native American woman in tradtional clothing. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-a1e5-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
Public Domain
An Uainuint Paiute aiming a rifle, southwestern Utah 

c. 1873

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce on horseback at Colville Indian Reservation in Washington State, the year before he passed away 

- 1903

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Chief Red Cloud in the 1880s

In 1880, Chief Red Cloud and other Native American leaders visited Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Joseph Bird Head with handcrafted club

 c. 1898

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Young Omahaw, War Eagle, Little Missouri, and Pawnees”

- 1821

by American artist Charles Bird King via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Two Eskimo women 

c. 1903

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Apache Scouts - U.S. Army 

c. 1881-1885

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Cherokee Woman, North Carolina

c. 1929

via The J. Paul Getty Museum, source says not in copyright
Chief Two-Moon and bus

- December 1925

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Wovoka, the Native American prophet who sparked the Ghost Dance movement of the late 1880s.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A Modern Cherokee Cabin on the Qualla Reservation, North Carolina.

- late 1800s, early 1900s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sioux Chief, Hole-In-The-Day

c. 1860s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
c. 1902

Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "A dusky Madonna." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed December 29, 2018. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-1702-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
An Arikara medicine man named Bear's Belly shown wrapped in his sacred bear skin - 1908

https://edwardcurtis.com/product/bears-belly-arikara-1909/

http://www.mhanation.com/main2/history/PDFs/The%20Sahnish%20(Arikara).pdf

Photo By Edward S. Curtis - Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
Navajo Chiefs with a child in traditional Native American dress holding a bow and arrow 

c. 1890s

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Arapaho Indians standing in front of teepee 

- November 18th, 1904

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Becky Kellis, Shinnecock Indian

c. 1933

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
A Cree Woman 

c. 1928

by Edward S. Curtis via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A group of Native American children in front of teepees in a photo titled "A Wichita Camp”

c. 1904 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
White Buffalo, Arapahoe 

- 1898 

by Frank Rinehart from Boston Public Library, CC-BY-SA 2.0
A cabinet card of Sitting Bull 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Samuel Lone Bear, a Sioux Indian from Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show

c. 1900

https://heartfelthistory.com/native-american/

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Naches" or "Wei-chi-ti" Apache leader (Son of Cochise) & wife
 
c. 1884 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002715256/
Nez Perce baby 

- 1911 

by Edward S. Curtis via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Perhaps the greatest joy to me was that now I could marry the fair Alope, daughter of No-po-so. She was a slender, delicate girl, but we had been lovers for a long time. So, as soon as the council granted me these privileges I went to see her father concerning our marriage. Perhaps our love was of no interest to him; perhaps he wanted to keep Alope with him, for she was a dutiful daughter; at any rate he asked many ponies for her. I made no reply, but in a few days appeared before his wigwam with the herd of ponies and took with me Alope. This was all the marriage ceremony necessary in our tribe. 

Not far from my mother's tepee I had made for us a new home. The tepee was made of buffalo hides and in it were many bear robes, lion hides, and other trophies of the chase, as well as my spears, bows, and arrows. Alope had made many little decorations of beads and drawn work on buck-skin, which she placed in our tepee. She also drew many pictures on the walls of our home. She was a good wife, but she was never strong. We followed the traditions of our fathers and were happy. Three children came to us — children that played, loitered, and worked as I had done.”

From: Geronimo's story of his life, published in 1906
https://archive.org/details/geronimosstoryof00gero/page/38/mode/2up
Source says not in copyright

Image: Geronimo c. 1894 via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2018662336/
A photo of a Native American (Tlingit) from Alaska

- June 8th, 1896 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004679507/
Unidentified Blackfoot Chief on horseback and another member of the tribe with a walking stick 

-1910

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
A young Native American (Wishram) woman from Oregon in bridal dress

c. 1910

by Edward S. Curtis via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Mexican troops were seen by our scouts in several directions. The United States troops were coming down from the north. We were well armed with guns and supplied with ammunition, but we did not care to be surrounded by the troops of two governments, so we started to move our camp southward. 

One night we made camp some distance from the mountains by a stream. There was not much water in the stream, but a deep channel was worn through the prairie and small trees were beginning to grow here and there along the bank of this stream. 

In those days we never camped without placing scouts, for we knew that we were liable to be attacked at any time. The next morning just at daybreak our scouts came in, aroused the camp, and notified us that Mexican troops were approaching. Within five minutes the Mexicans began firing on us. We took to the ditches made by the stream, and had the women and children busy digging these deeper. I gave strict orders to waste no ammunition and keep under cover. We killed many Mexicans that day and in turn lost heavily, for the fight lasted all day. Frequently troops would charge at one point, be repulsed, then rally and charge at another point. 

About noon we began to hear them speaking my name with curses. In the afternoon the general came on the field and the fighting became more furious. I gave orders to my warriors to try to kill all the Mexican officers. About three o'clock the general called all the officers together at the right side of the field. The place where they assembled was not very far from the main stream, and a little ditch ran out close to where the officers stood. Cautiously I crawled out this ditch very close to where the council was being held. The general was an old warrior. The wind was blowing in my direction, so that I could hear all he said, and I understood most of it. This is about what he told them: "Officers, yonder in those ditches is the red devil Geronimo and his hated band. This must be his last day. Ride on him from both sides of the ditches; kill men, women, and children; take no prisoners; dead Indians are what we want. Do not spare your own men; exterminate this band at any cost; I will post the wounded to shoot all deserters; go back to your companies and advance." 

Just as the command to go forward was given I took deliberate aim at the general and he fell. In an instant the ground around me was riddled with bullets, but I was untouched. The Apaches had seen. From all along the ditches arose the fierce war-cry of my people. The columns wavered an instant and then swept on; they did not retreat until our fire had destroyed the front ranks. 

After this their fighting was not so fierce, yet they continued to rally and readvance until dark. They also continued to speak my name with threats and curses. That night before the firing had ceased a dozen Indians had crawled out of the ditches and set fire to the long prairie grass behind the Mexican troops. During the confusion that followed we escaped to the mountains. 

This was the last battle that I ever fought with Mexicans. United States troops were, trailing us continually from this time until the treaty was made with General Miles in Skeleton Canon. 

During my many wars with the Mexicans I received eight wounds, as follows: shot in the right leg above the knee, and still carry the bullet; shot through the left forearm; wounded in the right leg below the knee with a saber; wounded on top of the head with the butt of a musket; shot just below the outer corner of the left eye; shot in left side; shot in the back. I have killed many Mexicans; I do not know how many, for frequently I did not count them.”

From: Geronimo's story of his life, published in 1906
https://archive.org/details/geronimosstoryof00gerorich/page/106/mode/1up
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Geronimo in 1887 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Westward the Star Of Empire”

Painting depicts Native American warriors sabotaging a railroad in the west as a train quickly approaches.  

c. 1880

by Theodore Kaufmann via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Three Native Americans watering their horses

c. 1910

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sitting Bear, Arikara 

c. 1908

by Edward S. Curtis via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/97518920/