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The earliest authenticated portrait of George Washington, completed in 1772. 

Portrait by Charles Willson Peale - Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
General George Washington visits an injured Continental soldier at Valley Forge 

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
George Washington at Mount Vernon

by American artist Alfred Jacob Miller via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Example, whether it be good or bad, has a powerful influence.”

- George Washington in 1780

Image: George Washington by Charles Willson Peale via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Martha Washington visits George at headquarters, Morristown

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Did you know that George Washington never attended college?

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
The Prayer at Valley Forge

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"John B. Hynes unveiling Emanuel Leutze's painting "Washington at Dorchester Heights" in the McKim Building of the Boston Public Library as part of city's 325th birthday celebrations”

- 1955

via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, CC BY-NC-ND
Who fired the first American cannon at Yorktown on October 9th, 1781?

- George Washington 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington at Mt. Vernon

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Harper’s cover showing George Washington 

- January 1896

via Digital Commonwealth - Massachusetts Collections Online, no known restrictions
“With quick decision Washington left his campfires burning on the river bank, and taking roundabout roads, which he had already reconnoitred, marched on Princeton. By sunrise he was in the outskirts of the town. Mercer, detached with some three hundred men, fell in with Mawhood's regiment, and a sharp action ensued. Mercer was mortally wounded, and his men gave way just as the main army came upon the field. The British charged, and as the raw Pennsylvanian troops in the van wavered, Washington rode to the front, and reining his horse within thirty yards of the British, ordered his men to advance. The volleys of musketry left him unscathed, the men stood firm, the other divisions came rapidly into action, and the enemy gave way in all directions. The two other British regiments were driven through the town and routed. Had there been cavalry they would have been entirely cut off. As it was, they were completely broken, and in this short but bloody action they lost five hundred men in killed, wounded, and prisoners. It was too late to strike the magazines at Brunswick, as Washington had intended, and so he withdrew once more with his army to the high lands to rest and recruit. 

His work was done, however. The country, which 
had been supine, and even Hostile, rose now, and 
the British were attacked, surprised, and cut off in 
all directions...”

From George Washington by Henry Cabot Lodge
https://archive.org/details/georgewashington00washuoft/page/176/mode/2up?q=Princeton
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Washington leading his Army at Princeton on January 3rd, 1777 via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
George Washington’s Inaugural Address parchment replica 

Available at Heartfelt History Gift Shoppe - Premium  

https://heartfelthistory.com/store/george-washington-inaugural-address-parchment-replica-in-tube/
It’s generally accepted that George Washington and his Continental Army raised the Grand Union Flag at Somerville, Massachusetts at the beginning of January 1776

Image via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Washington inspecting the colors after the Battle of Trenton which took place on December 26th, 1776

https://heartfelthistory.com/hero-tales-american-history-battle-trenton/
"March to Valley Forge”

Painting of George Washington leading his Continental Army to Valley Forge by American artist William B. T. Trego 

On December 19th, 1777 Washington lead his beleaguered Army into winter quarters at Valley Forge in Pennsylvania. 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Defender, Martyr, Father - Ulysses S. Grant, Abraham Lincoln and George Washington 

c. 1870

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Washington Endeavoring To Rally The Fugitives

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
General George Washington at The Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
George Washington, Patrick Henry & Edmund Pendleton going to the First Continental Congress

Image via NYPL Digital Collections, public domain
"Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be. That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks, for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation, for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his providence, which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war...”

- George Washington’s Thanksgiving Proclamation in 1789 

George Washington by Rembrandt Peale via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington was 6’ 2” tall which was considerably taller than most Revolutionary War soldiers whose average height was about 5’ 8” tall.

Sketch of George Washington, public domain
On November 2nd, 1783 George Washington issued a farewell address to his troops just outside of Princeton, New Jersey.

This painting of Washington was created while he was staying at Rockingham and when he issued the farewell address to his Army near Princeton, New Jersey during the autumn of 1783.

Image by William Dunlap 1783 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On October 11th, 1976 President Gerald Ford approved a congressional resolution that designated George Washington as “General of The Armies.” This promotion of Washington came nearly 177 years after his death. 

Image: His Excel: G: Washington Esq: LLD. Late Commander in Chief of the Armies of the U.S. of America & President of the Convention of 1787 via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
"All see, and most admire, the glare which hovers round the external trappings of elevated office. To me there is nothing in it, beyond the lustre which may be reflected from its connection with a power of promoting human felicity.”

- George Washington 

A rare painting of George Washington from 1795
via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"This Government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true Liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their Constitutions of Government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish Government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established Government.”

From: Washington’s Farewell Address which was published in September 1796

Image: Washington’s Farewell by Percy Moran via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
"That as it has always been a source of serious regret with me to see the youth of these United States sent to foreign countries for the purpose of education, often before their minds were formed or they had imbibed any adequate ideas of the happiness of their own, contracting too frequently not only habits of dissipation and extravagance, but principles unfriendly to republican government and to the true and genuine liberties of mankind, which thereafter are rarely overcome. For these reasons it has been my ardent wish to see a plan devised on a liberal scale which would have a tendency to spread systematic ideas through all parts of this rising Empire”

From the Last Will and Testament of George Washington which was written about 5 months prior to his death in 1799

Portrait of George Washington via NYPL, no known restrictions 
http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-31eb-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
An engraving of George Washington about a year after he became President of The United States

- 1790

Engraving by Edward Savage via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
It was more than 7 & 1/2 years after the British surrendered at Yorktown when George Washington became President of The United States.

Image: Portrait of George Washington via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"It has demonstrated that our prosperity rests on solid foundations, by furnishing an additional that my fellow citizens understand the true principles of government and liberty; that they feel their inseparable union; that notwithstanding all the devices which have been used to sway them from their interest and duty.”

- President George Washington during his Sixth State of the Union Address in 1794

Image of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Tonight, our mission, our duty as a free people, is to stem the tide of these atrocities, to retake what is rightfully ours and rid this great land of the plague of the merceneries, and those who brought them to our shores. At this fateful hour the eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us. The eyes of the world are watching. Let us show them all that a freeman contending for Liberty on his own ground is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.”

- George Washington announcing the attack on Trenton, Christmas 1776

Image: George Washington by James Peale via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"We are either a united people, or we are not. If the former, let us, in all matters of general concern act as a Nation, which have national objects to promote, and a national character to support.”

- George Washington in 1785

Painting of Washington from 1795 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Washington at the Battle of Monmouth in New Jersey 

- 1778

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
General George Washington meeting with the Count de Rochambeau (pointing) as they plan their operations against Yorktown

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
The evacuation of Boston by the British in 1776.

This early victory for George Washington led to the retreat of over 10,000 British and British loyalists on St. Patrick’s Day who boarded ships bound for Nova Scotia. 

Image via New York Public Library, no known restrictions.
The sofa that was used by George Washington and his family in the executive mansion in Philadelphia when he was President of The United States 

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Washington and his generals

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
On July 3rd, 1775 in Cambridge, Massachusetts - George Washington took command over the Continental Army.

“Pushing on through Connecticut he reached Watertown, where he was received by the provincial congress of Massachusetts, on July 2, with every expression of attachment and confidence. Lingering less than an hour for this ceremony, he rode on to the headquarters at Cambridge, and when he came within the lines the 
shouts of the soldiers and the booming of cannon 
announced his arrival to the English in Boston. 

The next day he rode forth in the presence of a 
great multitude, and the troops having been drawn 
up before him, he drew his sword beneath the 
historical elm-tree, and took command of the first 
American army. "His excellency," wrote Dr. Thatcher in his journal, "was on horseback in company with several military gentlemen. It was not difficult to distinguish him from all others. He is tall and well proportioned, and his personal 
appearance truly noble and majestic." "He is tall 
and of easy and agreeable address," the loyalist 
Curwen had remarked a few weeks before; while 
Mrs. John Adams, warm-hearted and clever, 
wrote to her husband after the general's arrival: 
"Dignity, ease, and complacency, the gentleman 
and the soldier, look agreeably blended in him. 
Modesty marks every line and feature of his face. 
Those lines of Dryden instantly occurred to me, — 

'Mark his majestic fabric! He's a temple 
Sacred by birth, and built by hands divine; 

His soul's the deity that lodges there; 
Nor is the pile unworthy of the God.' " 

From: George Washington by Henry Cabot Lodge, published in 1898
https://archive.org/details/georgewashington01lodg2/page/136
Source says not in copyright 

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "Washington at Cambridge--taking command of the army." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 3, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-f542-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
No known restrictions
"Finally, the day fixed upon for the evacuation, and for the triumphal entry of Washington and the American army, to take possession of the city, was Tuesday, the 25th of November. At an early hour, on that cold, but radiant morning, the whole population seemed to be abroad, making ready for the great gala day, regardless of a keen nor'wester. During the forenoon many delegations from the suburban districts began to arrive, to share in the public festivities, or to witness the exit of the foreign troops, and the entrance of the victorious Americans ; while with the latter was expected a host of patriots, to re-occupy their desolate dwellings, from which they had been so long cruelly exiled ; or otherwise, only to gaze upon the charred and blackened ruins of what was once their homes!

To guard against any disturbance which such an occasion might favor, in the interval between the laying down and the resumption of authority, and as rumors were afloat of an organized plot to plunder the town when the King's forces were withdrawn ; the hour of noon had been set for the Royal troops to move, and by an understanding between the two commanders-in-chief, the Americans were to promptly advance and occupy the positions as the British vacated them ; the latter, when ready to move, to send out an officer to notify our advance guard. There was no longer any antagonism between these, so recently hostile, forces ; the plans for the evacuation, on the one part, and the occupation, on the other, being carried out in as orderly a manner, and to all appearance, with as friendly a spirit, as when, in time of peace, one guard relieves another at a military post.”

From: "Evacuation day", 1783, its many stirring events: with recollections of Capt. John Van Arsdale, of the Veteran corps of artillery, by whose efforts on that day the enemy were circumvented, and the American flag successfully raised on the battery. With illustrative notes
by James Riker, published in 1883
https://archive.org/details/evacuationday17800rikeiala/page/8/mode/1up
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Triumph of Patriotism, Washington Entering New York on the 25th of November 1783

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Washington and his Army began their crossing of the Delaware on the evening of December 25th, 1776.

They arrived on the other side of the Delaware River in New Jersey in the early morning hours of December 26th, 1776.

Image: Washington Crossing the Delaware by American artist George Caleb Bingham
George Washington subduing a camp brawl

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Mary Ball Washington the mother of George Washington

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"I was summoned by my Country, whose voice I can never hear but with veneration and love“

- George Washington 

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/

Image via Shutterstock
"I hope ever to see America among the foremost nations in examples of justice and liberality.”

- George Washington in 1790

Print of George Washington via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Washington inspecting the captured colors after the battle of Trenton 

by E. Percy Moran via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Washington Taking Leave Of His Officers

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Washington on his Deathbed in 1799

by American artist Junius B. Stearns, painted in 1851

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington's National Thanksgiving Proclamation

11/26/1789

"Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor, and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me "to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness. 
Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be. That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks, for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation, for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his providence, which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war, for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed, for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted, for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.
And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions, to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually, to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed, to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shown kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord. To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the encrease of science among them and Us, and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.
Given under my hand at the City of New York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789."

Photo: Art and Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "Portrait Of George Washington." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed November 20, 2017. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-3217-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
267 years ago, in late 1753, Major George Washington (only 21 years old at the time) embarked on a perilous journey to deliver stern correspondence from the governor of Virginia to the French commander in Western Pennsylvania...

"At last Washington persuaded the Indians to let three of their chiefs and an old hunter accompany his party to where the French were, and they followed the Allegheny to Venango, now Franklin in Venango County, Pennsylvania, where were a few Frenchmen who had driven out an English trader. But the really important station was Fort le Bosuf. 

The Frenchmen tried to entice the Indians from Washington, and otherwise to keep him from going on; but he insisted on carrying out his plans, and toiled for four more days through mire and snow drifts until he came to the fort. The French commandant, M. de Saint Pierre, received the Virginian commissioner politely, and entertained him for a few days with hospitality, but in the mean time did his utmost to win from Washington the Indian chiefs who had accompanied him. Finally, however, M. de Saint Pierre drew up a formal reply to Governor Dinwiddie's letter, and Washington and his party returned by canoe to Venango, having sent the horses and baggage on in advance. 

Now began a terrible journey. The horses were so weak, but so necessary for carrying the baggage, that Washington and his companions set out on foot, while the horses followed behind. Washington was dressed as an Indian, and for three days they kept on in this way, the horses losing strength, the cold increasing, and the roads growing worse. Then Washington, seeing how slowly the party was moving, determined to take Gist with him, and push through the woods, the nearest way, leaving the rest of the company together with the horses and baggage under charge of Van Braam to follow as well as they could. 

It was the day after Christmas when he started. He put his journal and other papers into a pack which he strapped to his back, wrapped himself in a stout coat, took his gun in his hand, and set off alone with Gist. They were only a few miles from Venango, and they meant to follow the path a short distance to an Indian village called Murdering Town, and then go by the compass through the woods in as straight a line as possible to the fork of the Ohio. The village was well-named; for shortly after they had left it, they were fired at by a French Indian whom they had taken along there as a guide. They pretended to think that his gun went off for some other reason ; but they kept him with them, watching him very closely all day till nine o'clock that night. Then they sent him home. But they knew well that he would rally his friends and pursue them; so they walked all that night and the next day, reaching the Ohio River at dark, and rested there over night. 

They supposed, of course, that they should find the river frozen tight and could cross on the ice, but to their dismay, it was frozen only near the shore, while blocks of ice were swirling down the middle of the stream. "There was no way of getting over," says Washington in his journal," but on a raft, which we set about, with but one poor hatchet, and finished just after sun-setting. This was a whole day's work; we next got it launched, then went on board of it, and set off; but before we were half-way over, we were jammed in the ice in such a manner that we expected every moment our raft to sink and ourselves to perish. I put out my setting-pole to try to stop the raft, that the ice might pass by, when the rapidity of the stream threw it with so much violence against the pole that it jerked me out into ten feet water, but I fortunately saved myself by catching hold of one of the raft-logs. Notwithstanding all our efforts, we could not get to either shore, but were obliged, as we were near an island, to quit our raft and make to it. The cold was so extremely severe that Mr. Gist had all his fingers and some of his toes frozen, and the water was shut up so hard that we found no difficulty in getting off the island on the ice in the morning, and went to Mr. Frazier's." 

Here they succeeded in getting horses, and in a few days Washington was at Williamsburg and reporting to the governor. He had not merely made a very difficult journey in the depth of winter and brought back an answer to the governor's letter ; but he had made the most minute observations of the condition and plans of the French; he had also strengthened the friendship of the English and Indians; and by patient, unwearied, and resolute attention to the object of his mission, he had brought back a fund of extremely valuable information for the use of the colony. There could be no doubt in the minds of his friends, after reading his journal, that here was a man who could be depended upon. They had known him as a prudent, careful, economical, deliberate, rather silent young fellow, whose judgment was worth having; but I doubt if they had fully perceived before what indomitable courage he had, how fearless he was in the midst of danger, how keen and wary in his dealing with an enemy, and how full of resources and pluck when difficulties arose. Here was no sunshine soldier. "

From: Chapter 8 of George Washington: An Historical Biography by Horace E. Scudder, Published in 1889.

Photo: Washington Crossing the Allegheny, by Daniel Huntington via Wikimedia commons - public domain
"For upwards of two hundred years the De Wessyngtons had now sat in the councils of the palatinate; had mingled with horse and hound in the stately hunts of its prelates, and followed the 
banner of St. Cuthbert to the field; but Sir William, just mentioned, was the last of the family that rendered this feudal service. He was the last male of the line to which the inheritance of the manor, by the license granted to his father, was confined. It passed away from the De Wessyngtons, after his death, by the marriage of his only daughter and heir, Dionisia, with Sir William Temple of Studley. By the year 1400 it had become the property of the Blaykestons.

But though the name of De Wessyngton no longer figured on the chivalrous roll of the palatinate, it continued for a time to flourish in the cloisters. In the year 1416, John De Wessyngton was elected prior of the Benedictine convent, attached to the 
cathedral. The monks of this convent had been licensed by Pope Gregory VII. to perform the solemn duties of the cathedral in place of secular clergy, and William the Conqueror had ordained that the priors of Durham should enjoy all the liberties, dignities and honors of abbots ; should hold their lands and churches in their own hands and free disposition, and have the abbot's seat on the left side of the choir — thus taking rank of 
every one but the bishop in the course of three centuries and upwards, which had since elapsed, these honors and privileges had been subject to repeated dispute and encroachment, and the prior had nearly been elbowed out of the abbot's chair by the archdeacon. John de Wessyngton was not a man to submit tamely to such infringements of his 
rights. He forthwith set himself up as the champion of his priory, and in a learned tract, de Juribus et Possessionibus Ecclesicae Dunelm, established the validity of the long controverted 
claims, and fixed himself firmly in the abbot’s chair. His success in this controversy gained him much renown among his brethren of the cowl, and in 1426 he presided at the general chapter of the 
order of St, Benedict, held at Northampton. 

The stout prior of Durham had other disputes with the bishop and the secular clergy touching his ecclesiastical functions, in which he was equally victorious, and several tracts remain in manuscript in the dean and chapter's library ; weapons hung up in the church armory as memorials of his polemical battles. 

Finally, after fighting divers good fights for the honor of his priory, and filling the abbot's chair for thirty years, he died, to use an ancient phrase, "in all the odor of sanctity," in 1446, and was buried like a soldier on his battle-field, at the door of 
the north aisle of his church, near to the altar of St. Benedict. On his tombstone was an inscription in brass, now unfortunately obliterated, which may have set forth the valiant deeds of this Washington of the cloisters.

By this time the primitive stock of the De Wessyngtons had separated into divers branches, holding estates in various parts of England ; some distinguishing themselves in the learned professions, others receiving knighthood for public services. Their names are to be found honorably recorded in county histories, or engraved on monuments in time-worn churches and cathedrals, those garnering places of English worthies. By degrees the seignorial sign of de disappeared from before the family surname, 
which also varied from Wessyngton to Wassington, Wasshington, and finally, to Washington.”

From: Life of George Washington by Washington Irving
https://archive.org/details/lifeofgeorgewash01irvi/page/10/mode/2up
Source says not in copyright
"Your love of liberty – your respect for the laws – your habits of industry – and your practice of the moral and religious obligations, are the strongest claims to national and individual happiness.”

- George Washington, 1789

Image: George Washington Esqr. via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2013645315/
"The happiness of America is intimately connected with the happiness of all mankind”

- Marquis de LaFayette, 1777

Image: Washington, LaFayette & Greene via NYPL, no known restrictions
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e3-b95c-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"Gutzon Borglum and supt. inspecting work on face [nose] of Washington, Mt. Rushmore, S.D.”

c. May 31st, 1932

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2005688919/
Fireplace, old kitchen (south wall) - Mary Washington (mother of George Washington) House, 1200 Charles Street, Fredericksburg, VA

George bought the home for his mother Mary and she lived here during the final years of her life. 

It was in this home where George Washington met with his mother before traveling north to New York City where he took the oath of office of the President of The United States in 1789.

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?q=Photograph:%20va0933&fi=number&op=PHRASE&va=exact&co%20=hh&st=gallery&sg%20=%20true
Washington's reception by the ladies, on passing the bridge at Trenton, N.J. April 1789, on his way to New York to be inaugurated first president of the United States

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004668039/
State dining room, Mt. Vernon mansion

c. 1880

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington's Grist Mill at Mount Vernon 

Two millstones inside this historic building are from France and were purchased by Washington himself. They are still in use today.

The mill was rebuilt in the early 1930s.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington's return to Mount Vernon on Christmas Eve, 1783

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"Washington's entry into New York: on the evacuation of the city by the British, Nov. 25th. 1783”

by Currier & Ives via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On February 20th, 1792 George Washington signed the Postal Service Act

Image: 1c George Washington stamp 1912 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Did you know that in 1792, President George Washington was granted honorary French citizenship?

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "Gen. George Washington" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed January 27, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47da-2337-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“...human happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected...”

- George Washington 

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "Washington at the outposts of Valley Forge" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47da-2dd8-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company.”

- George Washington 

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "General Washington." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e3-623c-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“Statue of George Washington outside the National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London”

Image by Elliott Brown, CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
“It is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness.”

- George Washington in his Farewell Address, 1796 

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "George Washington." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed March 20, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47db-a05b-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
The first meeting of George Washington and The Marquis de Lafayette in 1777

by Currier and Ives - 1876

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
George Washington by John Trumbull 

c. 1793

About 10 years after Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Did you know that there are more cities, towns, villages and boroughs in America (nearly 90 of them) named "Washington” than any other name? 

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "George Washington" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed August 15, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e3-4a8c-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
"We should never despair, our situation before has been unpromising and has changed for the better, so I trust, it will again. If new difficulties arise, we must only put forth new exertions and proportion our efforts to the exigency of the times.”

- George Washington in 1777

Image: George Washington by Thomas Stothard, 1785 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Washington at Valley Forge - Winter of 1777-8
On today's date February 20th, 1792: President George Washington signed the Postal Service Act which officially established the U.S. Post Office.

https://postalmuseum.si.edu/exhibits/current/binding-the-nation/starting-the-system/1792-postal-act.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/09/opinion/how-the-post-office-made-america.html

Photo: United States five cent stamp of 1966 via Wikimedia Commons - Public Domain
On today's date February 22nd, 1732: George Washington was born at Pope's Creek Estate in Westmoreland County Virginia. (Gregorian Calendar)

https://www.nps.gov/gewa/index.htm

Photo: Washington's Birthplace
Benson J. Lossing & William Barritt for Harper & Brothers (publisher) • Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
“As was the custom, the family took the name 
of its estate or village, and William de Hertburn was known as William de Wessyngton. The “de” was soon dropped and Wessyngton was pronounced and spelled, down through the centuries, Wessington, Weshington, Wassington, until it became Washington. The names of these knightly descendants of the Norman conquerors, in their various forms, are found in the lists of English chivalry all through the Middle Ages, and many of them engaged in heroic enterprises to be eclipsed only by one great American name which should evermore be “first in war." 

From: The story of young George Washington
by Wayne Whipple, published in 1918
https://archive.org/details/storyofyounggeor00whip/page/22
Source says not in copyright 

Image: The birth-place of Washington. At Bridges Creek, Westmoreland Co. Va.
The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "The birth-place of Washington. At Bridges Creek, Westmoreland Co. Va." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed February 18, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-7d86-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
On today's date February 21st, 1885: Washington Monument in Washington D.C. was dedicated.  Construction began in 1848 and the project took over three decades to complete.

On that day President Chester Arthur announced:
"I do now .... in behalf of the people, receive this monument .... and declare it dedicated from this time forth to the immortal name and memory of George Washington" 

https://archive.org/stream/39002011214286.med.yale.edu#page/7/mode/1up/search/February

Image: https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2004670332/, no known restrictions
On August 6th, 1787 the Constitutional Convention reconvened in Philadelphia and delegates discussed a draft by the Committee of Detail. 
The draft used in the discussion includes George Washington’s handwritten notes.

https://catalog.archives.gov/id/1501555

Image: Washington at Constitutional Convention of 1787 by Junius Brutus Stearns via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Every post is honorable in which a man can serve his country.”

- George Washington in 1775

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Picture Collection, The New York Public Library. "General Washington." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed November 9, 2019. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-31de-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
No known restrictions
"George Washington at The Battle of Princeton”
by Charles Wilson Peale

"With the break of day on that cold January morning (January 3rd, 1777), Cornwallis, to his astonishment and dismay, discovered that the positions on the Assunpinck were empty and that the enemy he had expected to crush so easily had escaped him. Nor had he long to wait before learning whither the Americans had gone, for the sound of cannonading, wafted southward by the breeze, apprised him of the danger which threatened the regiments at Princeton and the stores at Brunswick. "Our Generals, about eight o'clock in the morning," says Captain Hall, "had so far gotten the better of their surprise, that they set the army in motion.” Nor did they linger upon the way. General Knox says that they came back to Princeton, "running, puffing, and blowing, and swearing at being so outwitted.”

The rear of the army, which had been stationed at 
Maidenhead during the night of the second, reached Worth's Mill as the Americans were returning from the pursuit of Mawhood's men. Here the enemy were forced to halt, however, for Washington, despite the rapid succession of exciting events, had sent a detachment of troops under General James Potter, to break down the bridge over the creek. The men were still tearing up the planks under the personal supervision of Major John Kelly, when the head of the British column appeared on the hill above. The enemy at once wheeled their cannon into place and opened so heavy a fire with round shot that the workmen were forced to retire. Major Kelly, however, refused to desist, and continued to hack at the main timbers until he had rendered the structure unsafe for the passage even of infantry. Unfortunately a shot struck one of the planks upon which he was standing and he was precipitated into the swollen stream. He succeeded in reaching the north bank and started to rejoin his men, but his frozen clothes so impeded his progress that he was overtaken and captured by the enemy...”

From: The Battle of Princeton
by Thomas Jefferson Wertenbaker 
https://archive.org/details/princetonbattlem00prin/page/111
Source says not in copyright
The relics of George Washington that were on display at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Throughout the United States there are thirty “Washington” Counties and one “Washington” Parish in Louisiana 

Image:  Portrait of George Washington by Rembrandt Peale via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On August 18th, 1795 President George Washington signed The Jay Treaty.
It was an agreement between the United States and Great Britain generally designed to put an end to lingering disputes since the Treaty of Paris.

Image: George Washington in 1795 by Rembrandt Peale via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On August 7th, 1782 George Washington issues a new award that he designed called the Badge of Military Merit.

Image: George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Continental Army in America via NYPL, public domain
Young female gazes at a portrait of George Washington

c. 1850 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
George Washington at Princeton, 1777 by Alonzo Chappel

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Bushrod Washington, the nephew of George Washington 

He acquired Mount Vernon from Martha Washington after her death in 1802.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A print from 1876 titled 

"Washington’s Birthday”

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"To err is nature, to rectify error is glory”

- George Washington
“Perseverance and Spirit have done Wonders in all ages.”

- George Washington in 1775

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Portrait of General George Washington by Thomas Sully

- 1842

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On April 30th, 1789 George Washington took the oath of office as 1st President of The United States 

"...it would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official act my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States.”
From Washington’s First Inaugural Address 

Portrait by Gilbert Stuart via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection; that he would incline the hearts of the citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to government; to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the field; and finally, that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all to do justice, to love mercy, and to demean ourselves with that charity, humility, and pacific temper of mind which were the characteristics of the Divine Author of our blessed religion, and without an humble imitation of whose example in these things we can never hope to be a happy nation.”

- A Circular Letter from his Excellency George Washington, 1783

Image: Equestrian statue of George Washington in the Boston Public Garden via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A print issued on March 15th, 1804 titled: "Mount Vernon, the seat of the late Genl. G. Washington.”

via NYPL Digital Collections, public domain
The American Eagle, Guarding The Spirit Of Washington.

via New York Public Library Digital Collections, no known restrictions
"No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the Invisible Hand which conducts the affairs of men more than the People of the United States.”

- George Washington from his First Inaugural Address in 1789

Image: His Excellency George Washington via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"I merely wish to show at this time the cordial relations that existed between General Washington and those of his countrymen who were of Irish blood. It is an established fact, which no amount of sophistry can shake, that a very large part of the rank and file of the patriot army of the Revolution was of Irish birth or descent. Several of the more prominent generals were of this blood, while the number of regimental commanders, minor officers and privates ran well up into the thousands. The Irish element was also handsomely represented in the navy of the young republic. At one time during the war, twenty-seven members of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, Philadelphia, subscribed £103,500 in aid of the patriot cause. 

Upon the evacuation of Boston by the British, March 17, 1776, the Americans marched in and took possession. The siege had lasted several months. The countersign authorized by Washington for that day of triumph was "St. Patrick,” and the brigadier of the day was Gen. John Sullivan. At a meeting in Philadelphia, Dec. 17, 1781, of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, already mentioned, Washington was made an “adopted Irishman,” so to speak, by being admitted to membership. A few days later, upon being presented with an address, and the insignia 
or medal of the organization, he made the following 
reply : — 

'Sir : 

I accept with singular pleasure, the Ensign of so worthy a Fraternity as that of the Sons of St. Patrick in this city. — a Society distinguished for the firm Adherence of its Members to the glorious cause in which we are embarked. 

Give me leave to assure you, Sir, that I shall never cast my eyes upon the badge with which I am Honoured, but with a grateful remembrance of the polite and affectionate manner in which it was presented. 

I am, with Respect and Esteem, Sir, 

Your mo. ob. Servant, 

George Washington. 

To George Campbell, Esq., President of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, in the city of Philadelphia.’

Washington dined with the Friendly Sons on at least three occasions, viz.: Jan. 1, 1782, March 18, 1782, and June 18, 1787. A party of Irish gentlemen, most of them belonging to the Irish Volunteers, arrived in New York from Ireland in November, 1783, and addressed congratulations to Washington on the successful termination of the 
American Revolution. To this address Washington thus replied: — 

To the Members of the Volunteer Association and other inhabitants of the Kingdom of Ireland who have lately arrived in the city of New York : — 

Gentlemen : The testimony of your satisfaction at 
the glorious termination of the late contest, and your indulgent opinion of my agency in it, afford me singular pleasure and merit my warmest acknowledgment. If the example of the Americans, successfully contended in the cause of freedom, can be of any use to other nations, we shall have an additional motive for rejoicing at so prosperous an event. 

It was not an uninteresting consideration to learn that the Kingdom of Ireland, by a bold and manly conduct, had obtained the redress of many of its grievances; and it is much to be wished that the blessings of equal liberty and unrestrained commerce may yet prevail more extensively. 
In the meantime, you may be assured, gentlemen, that the hospitality and beneficence of your countrymen to our brethren, who have been prisoners of war, are neither unknown nor unregarded. 

The bosom of America is open to receive not only the opulent and respectable stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all nations and religions, whom we shall welcome to a participation in all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment. 

George Washington. 

******** 

Various organizations in Ireland also sent congratulations. One of these bodies was the Yankee Club, of Stewartstown, Tyrone. Washington, replying to its good wishes, Jan. 20, 1784, and writing from Mount Vernon, 
said : — 
Gentlemen :It is with unfeigned satisfaction that I 
accept your congratulation on the late happy and glorious revolution. ... If, in the course of our successful contest, good consequences have resulted to the oppressed Kingdom of Ireland, it will afford a new source of felicitation to all who respect the interests of humanity. 

******** 

General Washington’s esteem for the people of Ireland and for the Irish in his command is further illustrated by the order issued by him for the observance of St. Patrick’s day, 1780.”

From: The Irish Washingtons at home and abroad , together with some mention of the ancestry of the American Pater patriae. Section written by Thomas Hamilton Murray, published in 1898
https://archive.org/details/irishwashingtons00wash_0/page/32/mode/1up
Source says no known restrictions
"Among the guests at Mr. Chamberlayne's was a young and blooming widow, Mrs. Martha Custis, daughter of Mr. John Dandridge, both patrician names in the province. Her husband, John Parke Custis, had been dead about three years, leaving her with two young children, and a large fortune. She is represented as being rather below the middle size, but extremely well shaped, with an agreeable countenance, dark hazel eyes and hair, and those frank, engaging manners, so captivating in Southern women. 

We are not informed whether Washington had met with her before ; probably not during her widowhood, as during that time he had been almost continually on the frontier. We have shown that, with all his gravity and reserve, he was quickly susceptible to female charms ; and they may have had a greater effect upon him when thus casually encountered in fleeting moments snatched from the cares and perplexities and rude scenes of frontier warfare. At any rate, his heart appears to have been taken by surprise. 

The dinner, which in those days was an earlier meal than at present, seemed all too short. The afternoon passed away like a dream. Bishop was punctual to the orders he had received on halting ; the horses pawed at the door ; but for once Washington loitered in the path of duty. The horses were countermanded, and it was not until the next morning that he was again in the saddle, spurring for Williamsburg. Happily the White House, the residence of Mrs. Custis, was in New Kent County, at no great distance from that city, so that he had opportunities of visiting her in the intervals of business. His time for courtship, however, was brief. Military duties called him back almost immediately to Winchester; but he feared, should he leave the matter in suspense, some more enterprising rival might supplant him during his absence, as in the case of Miss Philipse, at New 
York. He improved, therefore, his brief opportunity to the utmost. The blooming widow had many suitors, but Washington was graced with that renown so ennobling in the eyes of woman. 
In a word, before they separated, they had mutually plighted their faith, and the marriage was to take place as soon as the campaign against Fort Duquesne was at an end.”

From: The Life of George Washington by Washington Irving 
https://archive.org/details/lifeofgeorgewash01irvirich/page/253/mode/1up

Image: Chromolithograph of Martha and George Washington via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
“To encourage literature & the arts is a duty which every good citizen owes to his country”

- George Washington in 1784 

Image: General George Washington by Samuel King via Wikimedia Commons, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
"...the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right which Heaven itself has ordained.”

- George Washington from his First Inaugural Address in April, 1789

Image of George Washington in Prayer at Valley Forge brass relief at Federal Hall in New York City via Shutterstock

https://heartfelthistory.com/george-washington/
"Proceed, great chief, with virtue on thy side,
Thy ev'ry action let the goddess guide.
A crown, a mansion, and a throne that shine,
With gold unfading, WASHINGTON! be thine.”

by African American poet Phillis Wheatley 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Citizens, by birth or choice, of a common 
country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of America, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits and political principles. You have in a common cause fought and triumphed together; the independence and liberty you possess are the work of joint counsels and joint efforts, of common dangers, sufferings and successes.”

- George Washington from his Farewell Address in 1796

Image: George Washington marble sculpture via Los Angeles County Museum of Art, public domain