Eight thought-provoking images taken during the time of The American Civil War

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain A delegation of Native Americans on the grounds of The White House in Washington, D.C.         via Wikimedia Commons, public domain A very young unidentified soldier in Confederate infantry uniform     via Wikimedia Commons, public domain A nurse and her patients at Fredericksburg, Virginia         via Wikimedia Commons, public domain Guard House and Guard of the 107th U.S. Infantry at Fort Corcoran near Washington, D.C.       via Wikimedia Commons, public domain  Three officers of the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery leaning against a tree at Fort Brady, Virginia     via Wikimedia Commons, public domain Unidentified soldier of 23rd New York Infantry Regiment smoking a pipe and unidentified African American man with sword, sitting in front of tent       via Wikimedia Commons, public domain General William T. Sherman on horseback at Federal Fort No. 7 - Atlanta, Georgia       via Wikimedia Commons, public domain Three young home workers pose for a photo to help raise funds for their local Sanitary Commission     

By | 2020-05-17T18:26:09+00:00 August 11th, 2019|Heartfelt Histories, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Unforgettable Images of Old Glory during WWII

From the time of Betsy Ross to this very day the symbol of our great nation, Old Glory has been there.  In the early 1940s she hung behind a President who fearlessly addressed his citizens after the dastardly attack on Pearl Harbor. She flew on our battleships as they sailed to Normandy and was carried to the top of Mt. Suribachi by heroes. America stood together at the height of the world's greatest ever conflict and our flag was ever present. Each of the following images during The Second World War also show the Stars and Stripes in the photo. Long may Old Glory wave and long may we stand united in honor to those who have courageously gone before US. President Franklin D. Roosevelt asks for Declaration of War via Wikimedia Commons, public domain (December 8, 1941)       A view of lower Manhattan from the S.S. Coamo passenger ship at the beginning of WWII via Wikimedia Commons, public domain (December, 1941)     "Are you a girl with a Star-Spangled heart?" Women's Army Corps recruitment poster via Wikimedia Commons, public domain by Bradshaw Crandell (1943)     A young woman [...]

By | 2020-05-17T18:20:51+00:00 July 13th, 2019|Heartfelt Histories, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Life of William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison c. 1813 by Rembrandt Peale, public domain via Wikimedia Commons "On the banks of the James River, in Charles City county, Virginia, is a plain mansion, around which is spread the beautiful estate of Berkeley, the birthplace of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and of one of the Presidents of the United States. The former was Benjamin Harrison... The latter was his son, William Henry Harrison, whose life we will now consider. He was born on the 9th of February, 1773. At a suitable age he was placed in Hampden Sydney College, where he was graduated; and then, under the supervision of his guardian (Robert Morris), in Philadelphia, prepared himself for the practice of the medical art. At about that time an army was gathering to chastise the hostile Indians in the North-west. Young Harrison's military genius was stirred within him, and having obtained an ensign's commission from President Washington, he joined the army at the age of nineteen years. He was promoted to a lieutenancy, in 1792; and, in 1794, he followed Wayne to conflicts with the North-western tribes, where he greatly distinguished himself. He was appointed secretary of the North-western Territory, [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 9th, 2019|Heartfelt Histories, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Benjamin Franklin’s journey to Philadelphia at 17

On January 17th, 1706 Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston, Massachusetts. When he was 17 he traveled to New York and on to Philadelphia, but his journey wasn’t easy. “Franklin arrived in New York in October, 1723, without money or letters, and at the inexperienced age of 17. He failed in finding employment there; but was told by Mr. William Bradford, a printer, who had moved to New York from Philadelphia, that he could probably find employment in the latter place, as the son of Mr. Bradford, who was a printer in Philadelphia, had just lost his principal hand by death. Accordingly, our young adventurer pushed for Philadelphia, going by boat to Amboy, and leaving his chest to come round by sea. He had a rough passage in the boat, being overtaken by a squall, driven out of his course, and forced to anchor near Long Island, where nobody could land on account of the surf. The boat leaked, and he passed a wet, uncomfortable night, without rest and the next day made a shift to reach Amboy after being thirty hours on the water, without food, or fresh water, or any other drink than a bottle of filthy rum. [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 3rd, 2019|Heartfelt Histories|0 Comments

Andrew Jackson’s Presence of Mind

“Boys, big enough to carry muskets, incurred the dangers of men. Robert and Andrew Jackson had their guns and their horses, and were almost always in company with some armed party of their kindred and neighbors. Men could not sleep unguarded in their own houses, without danger of being surprised and murdered. It was upon such an occasion, that Andrew Jackson gave the first illustration of that quickness of conception, and readiness of action, which afterwards placed him in the highest rank of military chieftains. A patriot captain, named Lands, desired to spend a night with his family. The two Jacksons and six others constituted his guard; they were in all nine men and seven muskets. Having no expectations of an attack, they all, with the exception of a British deserter, who was one of the party, went to sleep. Lands' house was in the centre of an enclosed yard, and had two doors, facing east and west. In front of the east door stood a forked apple-tree. In the south-west corner of the yard were a corn-crib and stable, under one roof, ranging east and west. On the south was a wood, and through this wood passed the road [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 3rd, 2019|Heartfelt Histories|0 Comments

The World’s Longest Covered Bridge That Was Burned During The Civil War

The following article appeared in Harper's Weekly on July 18th, 1863 "On Sunday, the 29th of June, 1863 it was reported that the Confederates were on the turnpike road from York to Columbia Pennsylvania (twelve miles), and were four miles from Wrightsville, at the west end of the Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge; but as there had been many flying reports no attention was paid to this one, until the citizens of both towns were startled by the firing musketry and artillery. The force of the Confederates was about 2000, including horse, foot and artillery - ours about 1400, composed of infantry and cavalry, without artillery.  The rebels showed themselves well acquainted with the country, and instead of attacking our rifle-pits on the front or west, they appeared from the wooded hills on the north and south. Confederate General John Brown Gordon of Georgia - In 1863, General Gordon led his brigade to the town of Wrightsville in York which was the most eastern point reached by any Confederate force in Pennsylvania during the Civil War.   Our men stood their ground well until six or eight pieces of artillery opened with shot and shell, when they broke and ran for the bridge, which [...]

Hero Tales From American History – The Storming of Stony Point

  The Storming of Stony Point by Theodore Roosevelt   http://ia800302.us.archive.org/9/items/hero_tales_from_american_history_dl_0905_librivox/herotales_07_lodgeroosevelt.mp3   In their ragged regimentals Stood the old Continentals, Yielding not, When the grenadiers were lunging, And like hail fell the plunging Cannon-shot; When the files Of the isles From the smoky night encampment bore the banner of the rampant Unicorn, And grummer, grummer, grummer, rolled the roll of the drummer, Through the morn! Then with eyes to the front all, And with guns horizontal. Stood our sires; And the balls whistled deadly, And in streams flashing redly Blazed the fires; As the roar On the shore Swept the strong battle-breakers o'er the green-sodded acres Of the plain; And louder, louder, louder cracked the black gunpowder. Cracked amain!  - by Guy Humphrey McMaster. Major General Anthony Wayne by Trumbull and Forest [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons ONE of the heroic figures of the Revolution was Anthony Wayne, Major- General of the Continental line. With the exception of Washington, and perhaps Greene, he was the best general the Americans developed in the contest ; and without exception he showed himself to  be the hardest fighter produced on either side. He belongs, as regards this latter characteristic, with the [...]

Hero Tales From American History – Kings Mountain

  Kings Mountain by Theodore Roosevelt   http://ia800302.us.archive.org/9/items/hero_tales_from_american_history_dl_0905_librivox/herotales_06_lodgeroosevelt.mp3   Our fortress is the good greenwood, Our tent the cypress tree; We know the forest round us As seamen know the sea. We know its walls of thorny vines, Its glades of reedy grass, Its safe and silent islands Within the dark morass.  - By Bryant     The close of the year 1780 was, in the Southern States, the darkest time of the Revolutionary struggle. Cornwallis had just destroyed the army of Gates at Camden, and his two formidable lieutenants, Tarlton the light horseman, and Ferguson the skilled rifleman, had destroyed or scattered all the smaller bands that had been fighting for the patriot cause. The red dragoons rode hither and thither, and all through Georgia and South Carolina none dared lift their heads to oppose them, while North Carolina lay at the feet of Cornwallis, as he started through it with his army to march into Virginia. There was no organized force against him, and the cause of the patriots seemed hopeless. It was at this hour that the wild backwoodsmen of the western border gathered to strike a blow for liberty. When Cornwallis invaded North Carolina he sent [...]

Hero Tales From American History – Bennington

  Bennington by Henry Cabot Lodge     http://ia800302.us.archive.org/9/items/hero_tales_from_american_history_dl_0905_librivox/herotales_05_lodgeroosevelt.mp3   We are but warriors for the working-day; Our gayness and our guilt are all besmirch'd With rainy marching in the painful field; There 's not a piece of feather in our host (Good argument, I hope, we shall not fly), And time hath worn us into slovenry. But, by the mass, our hearts are in the trim, And my poor soldiers tell me, yet ere night They'll be in fresher robes. - By Henry V By UpstateNYer (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons The battle of Saratoga Is included by Sir Edward Creasy among his fifteen decisive battles which have, by their result, affected the history of the world. It is true that the American Revolution was saved by Washington in the remarkable Princeton and Trenton campaign, but it is equally true that the surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga, in the following autumn, turned the scale decisively in favor of the colonists by the impression which it made in Europe. It was the destruction of Burgoyne's army which determined France to aid the Americans against England. Hence came the French alliance, the French troops, and, [...]

Hero Tales From American History – The Battle of Trenton

  THE BATTLE OF TRENTON by Henry Cabot Lodge   http://ia800302.us.archive.org/9/items/hero_tales_from_american_history_dl_0905_librivox/herotales_04_lodgeroosevelt.mp3 And such they are — and such they will be found: Not so Leonidas and Washington, Their every battle-field is holy ground Which breathes of nations saved, not worlds undone. How sweetly on the ear such echoes sound I While the mere victor's may appall or stun The servile and the vain, such names will be a watchword till the future shall be free. - By Byron   IN December, 1776, the American Revolution was at its lowest ebb. The first burst of enthusiasm, which drove the British back from Concord and met them hand to hand at Bunker Hill, which forced them to abandon Boston and repulsed their attack at Charleston, had spent its force. The undisciplined American forces called suddenly from the workshop and the farm had given way, under the strain of a prolonged contest, and had been greatly scattered, many of the soldiers returning to their homes. The power of England, on the other hand, with her disciplined army and abundant resources, had begun to tell. Washington, fighting stubbornly, had been driven during the summer and autumn from Long Island up the Hudson, and New York [...]