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Flag of U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
The Fourth of July, 1916

by American artist Childe Hassam 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Then - Now - Forever 

God Bless America!🇺🇸

Recruitment poster for The United States Army, c. 1938
via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A speculative illustration of John Paul Jones hoisting the Stars and Stripes aboard the USS Ranger in 1777

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Betsy Ross making the 1st flag

Image: The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, The New York Public Library. "Betsy Ross making the 1st flag." New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed August 23, 2020. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/9c422caa-6ef0-9779-e040-e00a18060232
No known restrictions
Little boy standing, holding an American flag

c. 1890

via The J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
20 star American Flag from 1818

Image via Shutterstock
Little boy in a sailor uniform holding a small sword, standing in front of a framed portrait of William McKinley with an American flag draped over it

c. 1896

via Wikimedia Commons, from Library of Congress, public domain 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/90710001/
God Bless America!🇺🇸

“Woman making American Flag”
Maker: Mrs. Benjamin F. Russell 
c. 1910

via Wikimedia Commons, no known copyright restrictions
“US Navy Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) fold the American flag after shifting colors while departing Faslane, Scotland.”

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On September 30th, 1935 "Boulder Dam” was dedicated. 
During the Truman Administration, Congress officially restored the name "Hoover Dam” in 1947.

Image: An over 500ft long American Flag hanging over the face of the Hoover Dam in 1996 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Raising the American flag on Morro Castle, Havana, Cuba

- 1899

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
“Largest Old Glory placed on U.S. Capitol for flag exercises. An unusual view of the largest American flag in the world as it was displayed across the front of the United States Capitol where flag exercises were conducted by the United States Flag Association. The flag is 160 feet in length and 90 feet wide”

- 1929 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Formal raising of first flag of U.S. / Veracruz 2 P.M. April 27, 1914" 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
61 years ago today on July 4th, 1960 designer Bob Heft stood with President Dwight D. Eisenhower as the new 50 star American flag was adopted and flown as the official flag of the United States.
Women sewing American flags at the Brooklyn Navy Yard 

- Image dated July 7th, 1917

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2014705014/
Old Glory, flag

A postcard published sometime between 1912-1959

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
Group of children holding and surrounding the American flag

- 1891

via J. Paul Getty Museum, not in copyright
Betsy Ross was born on January 1st, 1752 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Her birth name was Elizabeth Griscom and she was named "Ross” after her first husband.  During her lifetime she had 7 children.

The first major motor vehicle bridge in America that was named in honor of a woman is the Betsy Ross Bridge that spans the Delaware River between Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Children with American flag

c. 1912-1919

via J. Paul Getty Museum, no known restrictions
34-star American Flag, c. 1861-1863

via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions
The first chronicled use of both music and lyrics of our National Anthem (performed simultaneously) occurred on October 19th, 1814 at the Holliday Street Theatre in Baltimore, Maryland.

God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image: National star-spangled banner centennial, 1914 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
On October 12th, 1892 the Pledge of Allegiance was first recited in public schools after President Benjamin Harrison issued his Proclamation 335 earlier that year to honor the 400th Anniversary of the landing of Christopher Columbus in The New World. It also said:

"... it is peculiarly appropriate that the schools be made by the people the center of the day's demonstration. Let the national flag float over every schoolhouse in the country and the exercises be such as shall impress upon our youth the patriotic duties of American citizenship.”

God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image: Schoolchildren pledging allegiance to the flag in 1908 via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Woman proudly holds American flag while saluting 

via Shutterstock
God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image via Shutterstock
Sidney Arthur Mounteer

c. 1898

Studio image of a little boy in uniform holding a sword as he stands next to the American Flag

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002710129/
God Bless America!🇺🇸

Photo: Stars and Stripes waving proudly near a snow-capped Pikes Peak and the Garden of the Gods in Colorado

Image from Jonathan Thorne - CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons
"The young volunteer”

c. 1860s

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2012648884/
HAIL, AMERICA!

HAIL, son of peak and prairie, 
Triumphant o'er thy foes!
Shod with the sands of Cuba —
Crowned with the Klondike snows!
The breast that nursed thee, shrunk with age, 
Still yielded milk of power; 
Past kingdoms prophesied thy birth 
And groaned to see thy hour. 
Hark ! Egypt moves her lips of stone 
" For thee I labored long." 
Listen ! The isles of Homer : 
"We named thee in our song.'' 
I hear a mighty struggling 
Like grave-clothes torn from death ; 
Millions of lips unmuffled 
Pour unaccustomed breath : 
"Hail, foundling of the western seas, 
Hail, harsh and sacred sod, 
Where the strong plant of Freedom 
Holds up its leaves to God! 
"For thee our toil, our anguish, 
The pathos of our years, 
Our baths in bleeding battles, 
Our lives of sweat and tears! ' 
Hark ! like a climbing sun, the Voice 
Mounts upward, — owns the sky, 
And clarions from the zenith 
In trumpet-tongued reply : 
"Ye shall no longer wait me, 
Nor call upon my name, 
I come, O buried fathers, 
The latest fruit of fame! 
The Indies pay me tribute, 
The Andes bring me toll, 
I own no serfs but loyal hearts 
That kiss my kind control. 
"My hands are free from slaughter, 
The sheath conceals the sword, 
I trust the regiments of Heaven, 
And navies of the Lord! 
Peace is my guard and angel, 
Her wings above me stir, — 
Mine arms I reach to all the world, 
Mine eyes I turn to her. 
"Yet, ah ! if honor's ensign 
Be trampled in the dust, 
With angry sorrow let me show 
How strife may still be just; 
I will tell History that she lies, 
Even at her very door, 
And buy a more enduring peace 
At the red cost of war. 
"Trafalgar greets Manila, 
All ages grow divine, 
Distance is dead, the Past a dream, 
And Marathon is mine! 
Wherever heroes die for truth, 
Beneath whatever sun, 
The years are lovers clasping hands, 
And all the world is one! 
"O buried sires, your hands are mold 
That once were hot to slay, 
Those eyes are filled with dust, that gorged 
With sight of human prey. 
Kings tremble on their purple thrones, 
Crowns crumble, tyrants die, 
While down untold Millenniums, 
March Destiny and I! " 
That tattered flag your father kissed, 
Fling, boy, against the gale
And join the cry that rends the sky : 
Hail, home of freedom, hail! 
Hail, son of peak and prairie  
Hail, lord of coast and sea
Our prayers and song, 
— our lives belong, 
Land of our love, to thee!

By Frederic Lawrence Knowles from "Poems of American Patriotism" Published in 1898 https://archive.org/details/poemsofamericanp00know

Photo: Gibson & Co. Hail! Glorious banner of our land. Spirit of the Union / Gibson & Co. lith., Cincinnati. United States, ca. 1861. Photograph. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/92504751/. (Accessed July 04, 2017.)
God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image via Shutterstock
"Decoration Day, Jefferson Barracks, MO."

circa mid to late 1910s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
R.W. Prichard, of Kalamazoo, Michigan, after he climbed the 70 foot pole to put up the rope for old glory, Wakefield Massachusetts rifle range

c. 1917-1918

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Battle-torn regimental flag of 82nd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment

c. 1860s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Raising flag, National Guard, Harper's Ferry, W. Va."

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 
https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016823041/
Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia 

c. 1897

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
A portrait of Mary Young Pickersgill who created the American flag that flew over Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland during the War of 1812 which was the inspiration of Francis Scott Key’s poem "Defence of Fort M'Henry" 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"The Growth of Our National Flag”

- 1885 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Astronaut Harrison 'Jack' Schmitt, American Flag, and Earth

- 1972

by NASA via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Rider With an American Flag on Horseback in a Parade on the Main Street of Cottonwood Falls, Kansas, Near Emporia

- 1974

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Captain H. M. Bragg, of General Gillmore's staff, raising the flag over Fort Sumter, February 18th, 1865, on a temporary staff formed of an oar and boat-hook.”

via NYPL, no known restrictions 
https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e0-ff08-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99
“Beautiful goddess of liberty, Star Spangled Banner, etc.”

c. 1866

Image by Frederick Coombs from Beinecke Library - CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Admiral Dewey's flag-ship "Olympia," as she arrived in New York Bay from Manila

- 1899

via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions
Ronald & Nancy Reagan aboard a boat in California 

- 1964 

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sailors decorating the graves of fellow sailors who were killed at Pearl Harbor 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
On January 11th, 1843 Francis Scott Key passed away at the age of 63 in Baltimore, Maryland.

Image of Francis Scott Key via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions
September 14th, 1814 ...

Francis Scott Key wrote the poem "Defence of Fort M’Henry,” the lyrics of the Star Spangled Banner which officially became the national anthem of The United States in 1931.

Image: The Star Spangled Banner by Percy E. Moran via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
🇺🇸365 Reasons To Cherish America!🇺🇸

Day/Reason #213: Francis Scott Key's birthday - August 1st, 1779

In addition to writing the lyrics of America's National Anthem, Key wrote a number of poems. One of his poems was called:

THE SONG

By Francis Scott Key 

"When the warrior returns, from the battle afar, 
To the home and the country he nobly defended, 
O! warm be the welcome to gladden his ear, 
And loud be the joy that his perils are ended: 
In the full tide of song let his fame roll along, 
To the feast-flowing board let us gratefully throng, 
Where, mixed with the olive, the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 

Columbians! a band of your brothers behold, 
Who claim the reward of your hearts' warm emotion, 
When your cause, when your honor, urged onward the bold, 
In vain frowned the desert, in vain raged the ocean: 
To a far distant shore, to the battle's wild roar, 
They rushed, your fair fame and your rights to secure: 
Then, mixed with the olive, the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 

In the conflict resistless, each toil they endured, 
'Till their foes fled dismayed from the war's desolation: 
And pale beamed the Crescent, its splendor obscured 
By the light of the Star Spangled flag of our nation. 
Where each radiant star gleamed a meteor of war, 
And the turbaned heads bowed to its terrible glare, 
Now, mixed with the olive, the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 

Our fathers, who stand on the summit of fame, 
Shall exultingly hear of their sons the proud story: 
How their young bosoms glow'd with the patriot flame, 
How they fought, how they fell, in the blaze of their glory. 
How triumphant they rode o'er the wondering flood, 
And stained the blue waters with infidel blood; 
How, mixed with the olive, the laurel did wave, 
And formed a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 

Then welcome the warrior returned from afar 
To the home and the country he nobly defended: 
Let the thanks due to valor now gladden his ear, 
And loud be the joy that his perils are ended. 
In the full tide of song let his fame roll along, 
To the feast-flowing board let us gratefully throng, 
Where, mixed with the olive, the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave."

Source: https://archive.org/stream/poems00keyf#page/n8/mode/1up

Photo: Francis Scott Key - attributed to Joseph Wood (1778-1830) • Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
American flag raised on Mount Suribachi on February 23rd, 1945

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Our Heaven Born Banner
Painted by William Bauly

c. 1861

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions 

God Bless America!🇺🇸
God Bless America!🇺🇸
Raising the Grand Union Flag by John Paul Jones on the USS Alfred
The first time an American Flag was raised on a US warship 🇺🇸

- December 3rd, 1775

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Betsy Ross 1777”

Conjectural painting shows Betsy Ross demonstrating how she cut the white stars for the American Flag.  Washington is seated in the chair on the left.

by Jean Leon G. Ferris via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
“The Flag of Our Union”

c. 1861

by Currier & Ives via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
“Be Patriotic”

c. 1918

God Bless America🇺🇸
Buzz Aldrin with American flag on the moon 🇺🇸

- 1969

He was 39 at the time.

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Two members of Frederick Cook's expedition, with U.S. flag stuck in igloo, at expedition camp site, North Pole

- 1909

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"Raising the first flag at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, circa 1776-77”

Copy of a painting by Clyde O. DeLand from the 1940s via Wikimedia Commons, public domain

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
"Hats off! - The Flag Goes By”

Hats off!
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,
A flash of colour beneath the sky:
⁠Hats off!
The flag is passing by!

​Blue and crimson and white it shines
Over the steel-tipped, ordered lines.
⁠Hats off!
The colours before us fly;
But more than the flag is passing by.

Sea-fights and land-fights, grim and great,
Fought to make and to save the State:
Weary marches and sinking ships;
Cheers of victory on dying lips;

Days of plenty and years of peace;
March of a strong land's swift increase;
Equal justice, right, and law,
Stately honour and reverend awe;

Sign of a nation, great and strong
Toward her people from foreign wrong:
Pride and glory and honour,—all
Live in the colours to stand or fall.

⁠Hats off!
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums;
And loyal hearts are beating high:
⁠Hats off!
The flag is passing by!

by American author Henry Holcomb Bennett c. 1898, public domain 

Image: Citizens of Vale, Oregon take off their hats during the Pledge of Allegiance in 1941 via NYPL Digital Collections, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
Man holds American flag on his porch as he makes preparations for Decoration Day 

c. 1914 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"The personal conduct of Perry throughout the 10th of September (the day of the battle) was perfect. His keenly sensitive nature never interfered with his sweetness of manner, his fortitude, the soundness of his judgment, the promptitude of his decision. In a state of impassioned activity, his plans were wisely framed, were instantly modified as circumstances changed, and were executed with entire coolness and self-possession. The mastery of the lakes, the recovery of Detroit and the far West, the capture of the British army in the peninsula of upper Canada, were the immediate fruits of his success. The imagination of the American people was taken captive by the singular incidents of a battle in which everything seemed to have flowed from the personal prowess of one man; and whenever he came the multitude went out to bid him welcome. Washington Irving, the chosen organ as it were of his country, predicted his ever-increasing fame. Rhode Island cherishes his glory as her own; Erie keeps the tradition that its harbor was his ship-yard, its forests the storehouse for the frames of his chief vessels, its houses the hospitable shelter of the wounded among his crews; Cleveland graces her public square with a statue of the hero, wrought of purest marble, and looking out upon the scene of his glory; the tale follows the emigrant all the way up the Straits, and to the head of Lake Superior. Perry's career was short and troubled; he lives in the memory of his countrymen, clothed in perpetual youth, just as he stood when he first saw that his efforts were crowned with success, and could say in his heart: 'We have met the enemy, and THEY are ours.’”

From: History of the Battle of Lake Erie, and miscellaneous papers by George Bancroft, published in 1891
https://archive.org/details/historyofbattleole00banc/page/185/
Source says not in copyright 

Image: Edward Percy Moran’s depiction of The Battle of Lake Erie on September 10th, 1813 via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Vintage illustration of a Bald Eagle flying above holding Old Glory as light shines on America 

- 1912 

via Shutterstock
Rare 24 star American flag c. 1822 to 1836

via Shutterstock
God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image via Shutterstock 

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
First flight of "Old Glory”
"As we were going out of the harbor of Newport, about midnight on a dark night, some of the officers of the torpedo station had prepared for us a beautiful surprise. The flag at the depot station was unseen in the darkness of the night, when suddenly electric search lights were turned on it, bathing it in a flood of light. All below the flag was hidden and it seemed to have no touch with earth, but to hang from the battlements of heaven. It was as if heaven was approving the human liberty and human equality typified by that flag.”

- Benjamin Harrison from his Tribute to Old Glory c. 1898

Image: U.S. President Benjamin Harrison via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Our Banner in The Sky 

- 1861

by American artist Frederic Edwin Church, via Wikimedia Commons, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
On April 12th, 1861 the American Civil War began as Confederate forces bombarded Fort Sumter. 

During the bombardment this American flag fell but Union Lieutenant Norman J. Hall, risking his own life within the fort, raised the flag again.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
36 Star American Flag 

c. 1865-1867

Image via rawpixel, public domain 

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
Betsy Ross House 

- 1890s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Sewing the American Flag

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions 

https://heartfelthistory.com/american-flag/
Man looking at a mural on a wall depicting soldiers and the American flag

Old Fort Warren on Georges Island in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts 

- 1958

Fort Warren was used as a prison during the Civil War that held Confederate officers.

Image via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions, CC BY NC ND
God Bless America!🇺🇸

Image via Shutterstock
Clara Barton’s Headquarters in Johnstown, PA following the historic flood that took place on May 31st, 1889.

Stars and Stripes proudly displayed on the wall.

Image via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"The Continental Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes as the official flag of our young republic on June 14, 1777. Describing the new flag, the Congress wrote, "White signifies Purity and Innocence; Red, Hardiness and Valor; Blue signifies Vigilance, Perseverance and Justice." Over time, the flag's design evolved to keep pace with our Nation's development and growth, but its meaning as a symbol of democracy and freedom has remained constant.”

- George W. Bush in 2001 

Image via Shutterstock
Flag Day 1914 - Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt and others in front of the State, War & Navy building in Washington, D.C. 

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
"A Living Flag” - Recruits - Naval Station Great Lakes in Illinois 

- 1917

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
An artist’s interpretation of Betsy Ross showing George Washington the first flag

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
The Land and Flag that I Love
Woman holding American Flag 

via Shutterstock
U.S. Air Force Airmen with Air Force insignia in Army green uniforms standing with Stars and Stripes 

c. late 1940s-early 1950s

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
"The volunteers in defence of the Government against usurpation”

- 1861

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Image of the American Flag of the 124th Pennsylvania Regiment in its torn and tattered condition when the soldiers returned home 

- 1862

via Wikimedia Commons, no known restrictions
American flag with "Grant & Wilson" banner attached to bottom flying over center of street in Milton, Massachusetts 

- 1872

via Digital Commonwealth Massachusetts, no known restrictions
“The Stars and Stripes wave over a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier at sea. On this flight deck is a Grumman "Avenger" TBM, torpedo plane; astern, turning to port behind the carrier is an escort destroyer.”

- 1942

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Souvenir “United States” button with 43 star American Flag 

Sometime after July 3rd, 1890 when Idaho became the 43rd state. 

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
U.S. Marines raising the American Flag in Afghanistan in 2001

Dear Lord, please watch over our military.
Keep them safe.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Columbia standing on the Earth holding Old Glory

c. 1890

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
Star-Spangled Banner that flew over Ft. McHenry in Baltimore in 1814

Image via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
J.R.C. Auxiliary forming American flag, Gulf Div., New Orleans, La., Esplanade Ave, Girls H.S.

- 1918

via Library of Congress, no known restrictions
A photo of Sergeant Gilbert Bates who marched the American Flag through the post Civil War South to prove he could do so without being harmed.

Image via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY SA 3.0
BE A U.S. MARINE!

- 1918

via Wikimedia Commons, public domain
Calvin Coolidge holding the American Flag 

- 1924

via Shutterstock
Signal Station, Light-house and "Old Glory" on Morro, Havana, Cuba

c. 1901

via NYPL Digital Collections, no known restrictions