Life of William Henry Harrison

William Henry Harrison c. 1813 by Rembrandt Peale, public domain via Wikimedia Commons "On the banks of the James River, in Charles City county, Virginia, is a plain mansion, around which is spread the beautiful estate of Berkeley, the birthplace of a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and of one of the Presidents of the United States. The former was Benjamin Harrison... The latter was his son, William Henry Harrison, whose life we will now consider. He was born on the 9th of February, 1773. At a suitable age he was placed in Hampden Sydney College, where he was graduated; and then, under the supervision of his guardian (Robert Morris), in Philadelphia, prepared himself for the practice of the medical art. At about that time an army was gathering to chastise the hostile Indians in the North-west. Young Harrison's military genius was stirred within him, and having obtained an ensign's commission from President Washington, he joined the army at the age of nineteen years. He was promoted to a lieutenancy, in 1792; and, in 1794, he followed Wayne to conflicts with the North-western tribes, where he greatly distinguished himself. He was appointed secretary of the North-western Territory, [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 9th, 2019|Heartfelt Histories, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Benjamin Franklin’s journey to Philadelphia at 17

On January 17th, 1706 Benjamin Franklin was born in Boston, Massachusetts. When he was 17 he traveled to New York and on to Philadelphia, but his journey wasn’t easy. “Franklin arrived in New York in October, 1723, without money or letters, and at the inexperienced age of 17. He failed in finding employment there; but was told by Mr. William Bradford, a printer, who had moved to New York from Philadelphia, that he could probably find employment in the latter place, as the son of Mr. Bradford, who was a printer in Philadelphia, had just lost his principal hand by death. Accordingly, our young adventurer pushed for Philadelphia, going by boat to Amboy, and leaving his chest to come round by sea. He had a rough passage in the boat, being overtaken by a squall, driven out of his course, and forced to anchor near Long Island, where nobody could land on account of the surf. The boat leaked, and he passed a wet, uncomfortable night, without rest and the next day made a shift to reach Amboy after being thirty hours on the water, without food, or fresh water, or any other drink than a bottle of filthy rum. [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 3rd, 2019|Heartfelt Histories|0 Comments

Andrew Jackson’s Presence of Mind

“Boys, big enough to carry muskets, incurred the dangers of men. Robert and Andrew Jackson had their guns and their horses, and were almost always in company with some armed party of their kindred and neighbors. Men could not sleep unguarded in their own houses, without danger of being surprised and murdered. It was upon such an occasion, that Andrew Jackson gave the first illustration of that quickness of conception, and readiness of action, which afterwards placed him in the highest rank of military chieftains. A patriot captain, named Lands, desired to spend a night with his family. The two Jacksons and six others constituted his guard; they were in all nine men and seven muskets. Having no expectations of an attack, they all, with the exception of a British deserter, who was one of the party, went to sleep. Lands' house was in the centre of an enclosed yard, and had two doors, facing east and west. In front of the east door stood a forked apple-tree. In the south-west corner of the yard were a corn-crib and stable, under one roof, ranging east and west. On the south was a wood, and through this wood passed the road [...]

By | 2019-02-09T08:37:04+00:00 February 3rd, 2019|Heartfelt Histories|0 Comments